Careers  |  1-877-321-8452
  • Ambulatory Surgery Center
    Ambulatory Surgery Center

    The single-story, 12,467-square- foot center represents a nearly $6 million
    investment in Central Arkansas’ healthcare community. The surgery center
    will house two 450+-square- foot operating rooms and four procedure rooms.


     


  • MonaLisa Touch
    MonaLisa Touch
    Life-changing treatment

    MonaLisa Touch® is a fast, simple and safe laser treatment for pelvic health.
    This in-office procedure provides symptom relief after just one treatment.
    Ask if MonaLisa Touch is right for you.

  • Exclusive to Arkansas Urology
    Exclusive to Arkansas Urology
    Exclusive to Arkansas Urology
    Rapid Relief from the Symptoms of BPH. Arkansas Urology is the only clinic in
    the state performing UroLift®, the newest procedure treating BPH.
    Minimal downtime, no overnight stay and preserved sexual function.
  • Expert Skill
    Expert Skill
    Expert Skill
    Exceptional Care for Arkansans. Our dedication to technology ensures that
    your corrective treatment and recovery is faster and more comfortable
    than ever – for a speedy return to the full, satisfying lifestyle you deserve.

Locations and Hours

  • BENTON (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    501-776-3288
  • CLINTON (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    800-255-1762
  • EL DORADO (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    870-862-5439
  • HEBER SPRINGS (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    800-255-1762
  • LITTLE ROCK (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    501-219-8900
  • NORTH LITTLE ROCK (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    501-945-2121
  • RUSSELLVILLE (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    479-968-2600
Find a Location Near You

Request an Appointment

To schedule an appointment at Arkansas Urology, call our toll-free number at 877-321-8452 or click the button below to schedule your appointment online.

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Urological Issues

Latest News

17

April 2017

What Is HIFU?

By: Arkansas Urology

HIFU, or High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound, is the newest breakthrough in prostate cancer treatment technology. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with prostate cancer, this new treatment method could be a minimally invasive alternative to traditional, intensive treatments of the past.

prostate-cancer-hifuHIFU waves target and treat small amounts of tissue through heat concentration at a specific “focal point.” Unlike surgeries or radiation, this means there is no incision point, no blood loss and no widespread damage to any other part of the body during treatment.

Each patient can be treated as a unique case, with a targeted treatment designed around their cancer. This minimizes any nerve damage in the surrounding area, which protects against the impotence typically associated with more aggressive forms of treatment.

HIFU technology has been practiced since as early as 1995 and was FDA cleared in October of 2015. With over 50,000 men treated worldwide, it is largely becoming the biggest breakthrough in prostate cancer treatment to date. HIFU treatments have the same effectiveness and survival rates of traditional procedures, with an impressive 97 percent five-year survival rate and a 97 percent metastasis-free survival rate.

This outpatient procedure involves minimal downtime and recovery. After treatment, there is an increased risk of contracting a UTI due to the use of a catheter for a few recovery days, but after this, the only potential side effects are changes in frequency or urgency of urination, mild discomfort or discharge in the urinary stream in the first few weeks following HIFU.

Before HIFU, men diagnosed with early-stage prostate cancer had to choose between a high-risk surgical intervention, careful monitoring of the disease or even no treatment at all. Now, we can treat early, effectively and while preserving your highest quality of life.

For more information about what HIFU can do for you or to schedule a consultation, contact us at 1-877-321-8452.

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3

April 2017

Drinking More Water With OAB

By: Arkansas Urology

Drinking more water makes most lists of healthy tips that you see. However, for people who suffer from overactive bladder the idea of drinking more water can be immediately ignored or maybe even a little scary meaning more trips to the bathroom or possibilities of accidents. However, drinking water can actually be helpful.

Drinking WaterIt’s logical to think if you are spending all your time in the bathroom that you don’t need to drink much, but that is not the case. Drinking water is actually one of the best things you can do for overactive bladder.

It’s best to spread out your water intake throughout the day. Take sips; don’t gulp down a lot of water at once. And also, make sure it’s water you’re drinking not just any fluid. Extra ingredients in soft drinks, energy drinks and even caffeine in coffee can aggravate your overactive bladder.

Think about your bladder like a sponge. It needs to get wet to start absorbing water. Your bladder should be saturated with water to expand to hold more.

When you stop drinking anything, you actually do more harm than good. This can result in highly concentrated urine. When you are drinking enough water, your urine should be light yellow or almost colorless. When your urine is darker and more concentrated you put yourself at risk for a urinary tract infection.

Hydration is one of the most important healthy habits. Remember your body is about 70% water, so it’s important to make sure you are drinking enough water. If you still have questions about your water intake and overactive bladder, our providers would be happy to talk to you more. Call us today at 1-877-321-8452 to make an appointment or talk to one of our staff members. 

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27

March 2017

Warning Signs of Chronic Kidney Disease

By: Arkansas Urology

Kidney damage typically progresses very slowly. While this is a good thing for those fighting the disease, it can mean that symptoms of chronic kidney disease often go unnoticed for so long that a diagnosis isn’t made until the kidney damage is irreversible. If you have any inclinations that you may have chronic kidney disease, read on to learn about the symptoms.

The most common symptoms of kidney damage are itching, muscle cramps, nausea and vomiting, not feeling hungry, swelling of the feet and ankles, too much or not enough urine, trouble catching your breath and trouble sleeping. Other symptoms can include fatigue and weakness, decreased mental sharpness, muscle twitches, chest pain (if fluid builds up around the lining of the heart), and high blood pressure (hypertension) that's difficult to control.

Because these symptoms are so broad and varied, it can be difficult to tie them all back to kidney damage. The kidneys are also extremely hardy and adaptable, which allows them to compensate for lost function extremely well and hide the warning signs until it is too late.

The key to early diagnosis is to watch for these symptoms in combination with one another. You should also make sure your urologist has tested for, and is aware of, any other diseases you may have that increase your risk of chronic kidney disease. Simple blood pressure and urine tests could be all it takes to keep a watchful eye on your kidney’s health.

Diabetes, hypertension, urine blockages, overusing painkillers, having an allergic reaction to antibiotics, inflammation and drug abuse can all put you at a higher risk for chronic kidney disease. Any concerns you have about these previous illnesses should be brought up at once with your urologist so that together you can plan preventative measures and monitor your kidney health frequently.

If you are experiencing two or more of the classic symptoms of CKD at once with any severity, you should contact your urologist right away. Early diagnosis is key to effective treatment. Call us today at 1-877-321-8452 to schedule an appointment or speak with one of our staff members.

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13

March 2017

Is a Small Bladder a Big Problem?

By: Arkansas Urology

There's nothing worse than asking friends and family members to stop and pull over during long car trips several times so you can use the restroom. It's easy to assume that some bladders are just smaller than others. But is this reality?

It’s a real misconception that some people just have smaller bladders that cause them to make frequent bathroom visits. However, that’s rarely the cause of your issue. In healthy people, your bladder’s capacity ranges from one to two cups. Even if you have had part of your bladder removed surgically, your bladder will typically expand back to normal size.

It is possible to have a functionally small bladder where your bladder is more sensitive to the need to urinate. For most people, you will feel the need to go when your bladder is half-full. Most people can wait to use the restroom past this point until it’s a more convenient time. However, with overactive bladder, the bladder muscle seems to give the wrong message to the brain so you think you have to go a lot sooner than you do.

A symptom of overactive bladder is if you have to go to the restroom more often – more than seven times a day. If this is the case, you may want to consult with a urologist about the issue. A doctor can help you find the best treatment option for you, which can sometimes be simple lifestyle changes.

If you think you may have an issue with overactive bladder, give us a call at 1-877-321-8452 for an appointment or to speak to one of our providers.

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Swings for Screens

Teach. Test. Treat. The Swings for Screens Foundation provides free patient education and health screenings men. We want to be at your next event.

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Kickoff to Men's Health

Arkansas Urology and Epoch Men’s Health observe National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month each September by offering men a free and complete health screening.

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