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Locations and Hours

  • BENTON (M 7:30-11AM, W 11AM-4:30PM, Th 7:30AM-4:30PM)
    501-776-3288
  • CLINTON (M 7:30-12)
    800-255-1762
  • CONWAY (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    501-327-5850
  • EL DORADO (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    870-862-5439
  • HEBER SPRINGS (W 7:30AM-2:00PM)
    800-255-1762
  • LITTLE ROCK (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    501-219-8900
  • NORTH LITTLE ROCK (M-F, 8am-4:30pm)
    501-945-2121
  • PINE BLUFF (M-F, 7:30am-3:30pm)
    870-890-4848
  • RUSSELLVILLE (M 8AM-3Pm, T 8AM-3PM Every other Friday 8AM-1PM)
    479-968-2600
  • STUTTGART (M, 8:30am-3:30pm)
    870-890-4848
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Urological Issues

Latest News

14

May 2019

Treatment Options for Overactive Bladder

By: Arkansas Urology

Did you know overactive bladder affects more than 33 million Americans of all ages? While you may feel alone in your journey, you certainly aren’t. When it comes to treatment options, you aren’t alone either. The professionals at Arkansas Urology offer a variety of treatment options, from medication to sacral nerve stimulation with InterStim. Behavior modifications include bladder training, biofeedback therapy, and Kegel exercises to strengthen pelvic floor muscles. We also highly recommend reducing caffeine and alcohol intake if you suffer from OAB, as they irritate the bladder and can worsen symptoms.

Your doctor may prescribe medication in conjunction with behavior modification, or if behavior modification techniques aren’t successful. Anticholinergic drugs—such as Detrol-LA and Ditropan-XL—are commonly prescribed to treat overactive bladder, as they relax and stabilize the bladder muscle and prevent involuntary contractions.

If the above treatments do not improve symptoms, sacral nerve stimulation with InterStim is another great option. During an InterStim procedure, a neurostimulator device is inserted near a nerve that affects bladder function, and sends electrical pulses to the sacral nerve. Stimulation of the sacral nerve can help improve overactive bladder, as this nerve affects bladder control muscles. The implanted device can run for five to 10 years. Our doctors have over 15 years of experience with InterStim, so you know you’re in good hands.
 
Several treatment options are available when it comes to overactive bladder, and we’re here to help you figure out what’s best for you. Poise pads are not the solution forever. Schedule an appointment and we will get you on the road to feeling like yourself again!

 

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14

May 2019

Medical Myth: All Prostate Cancer is Slow Growing

By: Arkansas Urology

Many people believe that all forms of prostate cancer are slow-growing, but sometimes prostate can cancer grow and spread quickly. If the cancer has spread to nearby lymph nodes by the time it’s discovered, it may already be located in other areas of the body as well. The potential aggressiveness of prostate cancer is measured between 1 and 5 on the Gleason scale, with grade 5 being the most aggressive.

Low-grade prostate cancers, with grades of 3 and below on the Gleason scale, tend to grow slowly and pose a smaller threat to your overall health. On the other hand, high-grade prostate cancers (grades 4 and 5 on the Gleason scale) often spread rapidly throughout the body and can lead to a variety of health issues. Once this cancer begins to spread to other parts of the body, it can become more difficult to treat. Many men who have slow-growing cancers, or limited life expectancy due to medical conditions or age, opt for a “wait and watch” approach. This involves monitoring cancer growth and attending regular checkups. However, treatment is commonly recommended if symptoms worsen. If there is an aggressive type of prostate cancer, treatment can be life saving.

Arkansas Urology utilizes two tests to help detect prostate cancer: the digital rectal exam, and the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) blood test. If cancer is suspected, our professionals will follow up with additional tests and/or a biopsy. If a test returns positive for cancer, we offer a variety of treatment options depending upon how advanced your cancer is, your health and medical conditions, the potential side effects of treatment, and your age and life expectancy.

Everyone is different, and every case of prostate cancer is different. Early detection is key, and the earlier prostate cancer is detected, the easier it is to treat. If you think you are experiencing symptoms of prostate cancer, don’t wait. Schedule an appointment with one of the skilled and experienced doctors at Arkansas Urology.

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4

April 2019

4 Changes Women Experience as They Age

By: Arkansas Urology

Many women experience a variety of changes as they age. While it’s common to be embarrassed when it comes to speaking to someone about these changes, it’s important to remember that they’re completely normal. If you’re experiencing symptoms of any of the following conditions, schedule an appointment with one of the skilled professionals at Arkansas Urology today to see how we can help.

Pelvic Prolapse

When an organ slips down into the body or becomes displaced, it is known as pelvic prolapse. This pelvic floor disorder affects about one-third of all women throughout their lifetime, and in most cases occur in older women. It is often discovered during a routine pelvic exam or Pap smear. The causes of pelvic prolapse vary, and a number of treatments are available depending on severity.

Urinary Incontinence

Uncontrollable urine loss is a common condition in the United States, and more than 80 percent of incontinence cases occur in women. While urinary incontinence can occur in people of all ages, it is a frequent problem in older adults. Causes include Alzheimer’s disease, lack of estrogen, a weakened pelvic floor, urinary tract infections, surgery, certain medications, and diabetes.

Menopause

The onset of menopause can affect women in a variety of ways. Symptoms include hot flashes, chills, irregular periods, loss of hair, fatigue and anxiety, and low libido among other things. Treatments typically focus on symptomatic relief. Hormone pellet therapy provides a steady stream of hormones to treat hormone imbalances often caused by menopause.

UTIs

UTIs occur in women of all ages. Symptoms include a frequent urge to urinate, a burning sensation while urinating, and cloudy urine. You can help prevent UTIs by not holding in urine when you need to use the restroom, urinating after sex, wearing cotton underwear, and drinking cranberry juice.

Several common changes take place as women age, but that doesn’t mean you should simply deal with being uncomfortable. A variety of treatment options are available, and our doctors are here to help you find the best solution for your condition—no matter your age. Schedule an appointment today!

 

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20

March 2019

Overactive Bladder - No “One Size Fits All” Treatment

By: Arkansas Urology

Contrary to popular belief, overactive bladder (OAB) is not a normal part of aging. While loss of bladder control can cause feelings of embarrassment, frustration, anger and low self-esteem, your doctor can help you find ways to manage your OAB. No one treatment is right for everyone, and often different therapies and treatments are used in combination at the same time.

The first course of treatment is lifestyle changes, also known as behavioral therapy. This includes removing all the “bladder irritating” foods out of your diet like caffeine, alcohol, soda, artificial sweeteners and spicy food. Keeping a daily diary of trips to the bathroom and food consumed can help you and your doctor understand your symptoms better.

Learning bladder tricks like “double voiding” or “scheduled voiding” can also be helpful in managing your OAB. You might also find relief from training your bladder with “delayed voiding.” Other behavioral therapies, such as pelvic floor exercises (Kegels) can help strengthen your urine control. Biofeedback equipment is another tool that can be used to better identify the muscles that need to be exercised.

Most people do not have relief from all their symptoms with lifestyle changes alone, so your doctor may prescribe a medication. More advanced treatments such as injections of Botox into your bladder muscle may also help to keep your bladder from contracting too often.

Finally, your doctor may suggest nerve stimulation if your quality of life is being more severely affected due to your OAB. Neuromodulation therapy is a group of treatments that deliver electrical pulses to nerves to change how they work within your body. Another option is sacral nerve therapy that is administered by implanting a “bladder pacemaker” (InterStim). This device stops the nerve signals that can cause OAB altogether.

As you can see there are many options available for those struggling with an overactive bladder. Talk to your doctor about what options may be best for you to live a happier, healthier life.

 

 

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Swings for Screens

Teach. Test. Treat. The Swings for Screens Foundation provides free patient education and health screenings men. We want to be at your next event.

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Kickoff to Men's Health

Arkansas Urology and Epoch Men’s Health observe National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month each September by offering men a free and complete health screening.

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