• Kickoff to Men's Health
  • Online Appointments
    Make an Appointment Online

    Arkansas Urology makes it easy to book an appointment online. 
    Find your location, physician and pick the time that is best for you
    all at your convenience!

  • Northwest
    New Location

    We have a brand new location in Bentonville to serve you.
    We welcome Dr. Adam Childs to Arkansas Urology.    

  • Men's Health Center 1
    Men’s Health Center

    Now open at 801 S Bowman Rd. in Little Rock 
    Contact us: 501-246-3423

     

     

  • Construction
    Warning
    Long-term road construction is taking place on Kanis near our Little Rock Clinic.
    This can cause road closures/delays that may interfere with traveling to an appointment.
    We apologize for any inconveniences this may cause.

Locations and Hours

  • BENTON (M 7:30-11AM, W 11AM-4:30PM, Th 7:30AM-4:30PM)
    501-776-3288
  • BENTONVILLE (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    479-268-6800
  • CLINTON (M 7:30-12)
    800-255-1762
  • CONWAY (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    501-327-5850
  • CONWAY SOUTH (T and Th 8am-4:30pm)
    501-327-5850
  • EL DORADO (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    870-862-5439
  • HEBER SPRINGS (W 7:30AM-2:00PM)
    800-255-1762
  • LITTLE ROCK (M-F, 8am-5pm)
    501-219-8900
  • MEN'S HEALTH - BOWMAN RD. (T and Th 8am-6pm, W and F 7am-5pm)
    501-246-3423
  • NORTH LITTLE ROCK (M-F, 8am-4:30pm)
    501-945-2121
  • PINE BLUFF (M-F, 7:30am-3:30pm)
    870-890-4848
  • RUSSELLVILLE (M 8AM-3Pm, T 8AM-3PM Every other Friday 8AM-1PM)
    479-968-2600
  • STUTTGART (M, 8:30am-3:30pm)
    870-890-4848
Find a Location Near You

Request an Appointment

To schedule an appointment at Arkansas Urology, call our toll-free number at 877-321-8452 or click the button below to schedule your appointment online.

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Urological Issues

Latest News

29

August 2019

Prostate Cancer: Tips for Caregivers

By: Arkansas Urology

When a loved one is diagnosed with prostate cancer, it’s often life changing. Cancer affects more than just the patient, and family members often worry about what they can do to be supportive and comforting in this difficult time. 

While everyone’s lifestyle and situation is unique, there are a few things that virtually all new caregivers can do to help:

  • Travel to appointments with your loved one. Listen and take notes when necessary so no information goes unnoticed or forgotten.
  • Do your research. Learn everything you can about the disease, understand the treatment options and provide support.
  • Be understanding. If your loved one is overwhelmed, suggest counseling. Don’t be afraid to sign up for your own counseling sessions if you need to. Allow your loved one to take time alone discussing questions with his doctor, if necessary. Know that you still play a very important role in his cancer journey.
  • Communicate with your partner about both of your emotions instead of shutting down. Understand that they are normal and acceptable.

A prostate cancer diagnosis is the beginning of a new normal, but there are several things you can do to help as you step into the role of a caregiver. Discuss side effects, responsibilities, new routines and how you feel with your partner to find a daily balance that works for you both.

Contact us today to schedule an appointment with one of our professionals to discuss treatment options, or book an appointment online in minutes.

 

 

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19

August 2019

What Does a Kidney Stone Feel Like?

By: Arkansas Urology

Kidney stones can go undetected for a while, but once one starts stirring around, there’s a big chance you’ll be in a lot of pain. Stones that remain in the kidneys may not cause any symptoms, but if a stone moves into the urinary tract, the symptoms can get intense fast. It sounds like this could certainly be a possible cause of the symptoms you’re describing.

Kidney stone pain can be felt in your side, back, lower abdomen and groin areas. It can start as a dull ache, then quickly transform into sharp, severe cramping or pain. The pain can come and go, meaning you may feel excruciating pain in one moment then fine the next.

Stones can vary in size, but some can be so large that your physician will have to break up before they pass or just remove them. However, some stones are so small you could pass them and never know it!

You may find it difficult to sit still due to being uncomfortable, and you may feel the need to urinate more often than usual. You might experience burning sensations while urinating, or notice blood in your urine. Other symptoms include fever, loss of appetite, profuse sweating, and diarrhea or constipation. Sometimes kidney stones can even cause vomiting.

Kidney stones can clearly cause a lot of pain and discomfort, and you should see your urologist as soon as possible to undergo diagnostic testing to determine the location of the stone and the best course of treatment for you. Most kidney stones will pass on their own, but some require medication or other forms of treatment. There’s no one-size-fits-all approach to treating kidney stones so it’s important to consult with your physician soon. In the meantime, drink plenty of water and take pain relievers when you need them!

If you’ve experienced any of the symptoms listed above, or simply need a routine check-up, don’t hesitate to set up an appointment with one of the skilled professionals at Arkansas Urology. Visit our website to book an appointment. All it takes is the click of a button!

 


 

 

 

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5

August 2019

Overactive Bladder: What's Normal and What Isn't When it Comes to Urination

By: Arkansas Urology

Overactive bladder is a common condition that over 33 million Americans of all ages face. Getting up to urinate often at night, the sudden urge to urinate, leaking urine, wetting accidents and frequent urination are not normal. These are all symptoms of overactive bladder, and contrary to popular belief, the condition has nothing to do with aging.

Many people believe that leaking, wetting accidents and problems urinating are normal things that just start happening as we get older, but that’s just a myth. Overactive bladder is never normal. The good news is overactive bladder can be treated, and you can go back to feeling like yourself again.

Most cases can be treated with medication, behavior modification and simple changes in diet. However, in the rare case that these treatments aren’t successful, overactive bladder can be treated with sacral nerve stimulation with Interstim.

If you think you may be suffering from OAB, begin keeping a voiding diary at home. Write down information such as how much you drink, when you urinate, how much you urinate and whether or not you feel an urgent need to go each day. Set up an appointment with your urologist as soon as possible for an examination and testing. Your daily log will help your doctor get a better understanding of your specific symptoms.

You don’t have to live in Poise pads or Depend guards. Don’t view overactive bladder as something you just have to deal with, because you do have options.

 

 

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15

July 2019

7 Things to Know About Testicular Cancer

By: Arkansas Urology

While testicular cancer is definitely rarer than prostate cancer, it’s very important to educate yourself on the condition. For men in their 30s, you should be all the more educated. Testicular cancer occurs when abnormal cells grow out of control in the testicles or testes. It is highly treatable and curable, especially when detected early, which is why routine exams are important. Here are a few key facts you should know:

1. One common risk factor that experts agree on is a history of an undescended testicle or a testicle that hasn’t dropped from the abdominal cavity into the scrotum by birth.

2. Common symptoms include a change in the size or shape of one or both testes; pain or tenderness in the testicles; a dull pressure or pain in the lower back, belly or groin; and a heavy feeling or painless swelling in the scrotum. It’s crucial to visit your doctor immediately if you experience a symptom to prevent possible spreading.

3. The majority of cases originate in undeveloped germ cells that produce sperm. These germ cell tumors (GCTs) are most common in men between the ages of 20 and 40.

4. While testicular cancer is rare, it is the most common form of cancer in men between the ages of 20 and 34.

5. Most men who get testicular cancer don’t have any risk factors, but a family history of testicular cancer should be noted when you talk to your urologist.

6. Most testicular tumors are discovered during self-exams or physician exams. Other diagnostic tests include CT scan, ultrasound and blood tests.

7. Most cases of testicular cancer are treated surgically, and the good news is that testicular cancer is treated successfully in more than 95 percent of cases! The condition is highly curable, even when diagnosed in a late stage.

If you’ve experienced any of the symptoms listed above, or simply need a routine check-up, don’t hesitate to set up an appointment with one of the skilled doctors at our Men’s Health Center. To book an appointment visit our website. All it takes is the click of a button!

 

 

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Kickoff to Men's Health

Arkansas Urology and the Arkansas Prostate Cancer Foundation observe National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month each September by offering men a free prostate screening in Little Rock and North Little Rock.

More Information