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Arkansas Urology is the largest urology practice in Arkansas and continues to offer the latest innovations in medical technology and surgical techniques to patients with a variety of urological conditions.

How Do UTIs Affect Children?

by Arkansas Urology on Monday, July 27, 2015

You might be surprised to know that urinary tract infections (UTIs) are actually common in children. Next to bedwetting, it’s the most common urological issue in children, and the second most common type of infection children get. Fortunately, urinary infections in kids can go away quickly when treated promptly.

The urinary tract includes the bladder, kidneys and connecting tubes, and carries urine out of the body. When bacteria get into the urinary tract, infection can form. UTIs may also be a result of an abnormality in the structure or function of the urinary tract, such as an abnormal backflow of urine, poor toilet and hygiene habits and use of bubble baths or soaps that irritate.

Girls have UTIs more frequently than boys do. Infections are more common while potty training. Uncircumcised boys under 1 year old also have a slightly higher risk of developing a UTI.

Signs and symptoms of UTIs will vary depending on a child’s age and which part of the urinary tract is infected. In younger children, the symptoms can be very general like irritability, not feeding well or vomiting. Sometimes the only symptom a parent may notice is fever.

For older children, the problem may be more obvious. Older children and adults will experience similar symptoms such as pain while peeing, increased urge to urinate, frequently waking during the night to go to the bathroom and abdominal or lower back pain.

At Arkansas Urology, we treat children as well as adults. Summer can be a prime time to get your children in for an appointment for any type of urological issue they might have. We have locations throughout the state to better serve you. Give us a call today at 1-877-321-8452 whether you need an appointment for you or your child.