Services

At Arkansas Urology, we provide specialty services you won’t find anywhere else in the state. We offer urologic services in our state-of-the-art facility and comprehensive surgery center. Learn more about our service areas, conditions and treatment.

17

September 2018

6 Facts About Prostate Cancer

By: Arkansas Urology

Prostate cancer is one of the most common cancers. Yet, it is also one of the most treatable types of cancer today. Because of that, there are ways you can educate yourself about the disease and learn how to cope with a possible diagnosis. Here are six facts about prostate cancer:

1. More than 200,000 men are diagnosed annually with prostate cancer, and an estimated 30,000 of these will die of the disease.

2. About one in nine men in the U.S. will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetime, and about one in 41 will die of it. Prostate cancer is serious, but most men diagnosed do not die from it.

3. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men, second only to skin cancer, and is the second leading cause of cancer death in men, behind lung cancer.

4. Not all prostate cancers are alike. More than 90 percent are found when they are confined to the prostate gland, and while some spread early and require treatment, many others are slow-growing and are unlikely to cause serious problems during a man’s lifetime.

5. The prostate-specific antigen test (PSA) measures the level of a protein produced by the prostate that circulates in a man’s blood. When there is a problem with the prostate, PSA levels are higher. For example, men who have a common condition called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) may have elevated PSA levels (BPH is not cancer).

6. Changing your diet and exercise regimen can help to reduce your risk of prostate cancer. Try to avoid consuming alcohol, caffeine and sodium. Be sure to check with your doctor before making any major changes to your diet.

To learn more about the widely accepted treatments available at Arkansas Urology, visit our Prostate Cancer Center. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with prostate cancer or needs to schedule a screening, give us a call today. We can help you through this journey from diagnosis to treatment, call 1-877-321-8452.

 

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5

September 2018

Best Foods for Prostate Health

By: Arkansas Urology

 

Did you know there are things you can be doing to help with your prostate health? What we put into our bodies is extremely important. When we provide our bodies with the proper nutrients it aids in keeping our health in the best condition. Here is a list of foods to keep in mind for prostate health.

1. Broccoli
A good rule of thumb is always make sure you have something green on your plate. Is your plate bland and brown or colorful? Thinking this way will help you look for those vegetables to add to your plate.

2. Cayenne
Really, any peppers will do. The ingredient that makes the pepper hot, capsaicin, is thought to help reduce the growth of cancer in the body. If peppers aren’t your spice of life, you can also try using cayenne as a supplement.

3. Green tea
Green tea is packed full of antioxidants like polyphenols, which are believed to help reduce inflammation and fight cancer.

4. Turmeric
Turmeric is full of curcumin. This is great for reducing inflammation and helps your body to increase it’s intake of antioxidants. It is also thought to help fight cancer cells.

5. Brazil Nuts
These nuts are a good source of zinc, thiamine, magnesium, and are rich in selenium, a mineral that is believed to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

6.Berries
Berries are another great source of polyphenols and are full of antioxidants. They are also full of fiber, potassium and vitamin C.

Try to avoid your consumption of alcohol, caffeine and sodium and instead increase your intake of fresh fruit and vegetables. Of course, always check with your doctor before making major changes to your diet.

 

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20

August 2018

How to Reduce Stress

By: Arkansas Urology

If you often feel like you are running on empty and dealing with a lot of stress recently, you may experience bladder issues. Stress can affect our bodies in many different ways and often manifests physically. How can you reduce your stress and improve your health?

Stop pushing yourself past your limits. Our lives are so fast-paced and slowing down can really help to stop the chain reaction of stress affecting your health in negative ways. Stress often leads to a poor diet and less exercise resulting in sleep issues. All of which can lead to more health issues. 

 

There is no magic pill to reduce stress. It’s important to identify stress triggers and then work to eliminate some of them. We know that work or family issues are part of your everyday life. Simple techniques to help like exercise or mediation can help. Learn to say no to some things and make sure you have someone to talk to when you are feeling overwhelmed.

Think of your body like a computer. When you only open a few programs at a time, the computer runs very well. When stress begins to affect the bodies programming, it consumes so much space that all systems are disrupted, even the bladder and urinary tract can suffer. Stress can create the urge to frequently urinate due to the tense muscles putting pressure on your bladder. Stress can indirectly contribute to the formation of kidney stones due to the chain reaction discussed above. Since stress can manifest physically, it is important to reduce the amount of stress in your life.

If you could simply look at life’s big picture, you would come to realize - most things that stress you out are not worth the toil they take on your overall health.

 

 

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7

August 2018

What Causes UTI's?

By: Arkansas Urology

Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are the second most common type of infection and account for over eight million doctor visits every year. Most people have experienced the terrible burning feeling and the relentless urge to pee. So how can you avoid getting another UTI?

Urine is actually very sterile but the tube called the urethra that allows urine to exit can also allow bacteria to enter and invade the bladder. One of the simplest ways to avoid a urinary tract infection is – if you have to go - GO! Holding urine for long periods of time allows any bacteria in the bladder a chance to grow. Drink a lot of water especially in the summer to help flush out the urinary tract system.

Women are more likely to contract a urinary tract infection because they have shorter urethras which allow bacteria quick access to the bladder. You can introduce bacteria while using the restroom or having sex. Always wipe from front to back after using the bathroom; keep the bladder empty and the area clean. Some simple things you can do to help prevent UTIs include wearing cotton underwear and drinking cranberry juice.

Kidney stones can also be a culprit because they can block the urinary tract and back up the urine and give bacteria plenty of time to grow. Diabetes can also increase your odds of contracting a UTI.

One in two people will get a urinary tract infection at some point, so remember if you are experiencing UTI symptoms such as painful and frequent urination, cloudy or smelly urine and fever, you need to contact your doctor. And if you need to go – GO!

 

 

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16

July 2018

Fact or Fiction: Should You Pee on a Jellyfish Sting?

By: Arkansas Urology

 

Jellyfish appear as a smooth, translucent bell in the ocean waters and are often seen on the beach shoreline. They are fun to watch and may appear harmless at first. However, when our skin comes in contact with the jellyfish’s tentacles – the pain is instant! Angry, red, whip-like lash marks radiate from the sting site and it starts to itch, burn and throb. Thankfully, the discomfort will peak after about five minutes and dissipate over the next few hours.

So what do you do if you or a family member has an encounter with one of these translucent, bulbous creatures? Don’t pee on it! Experts suggest that urine may even worsen the sting.

The recommended treatment is to immediately get out of the water and remove any tentacles. Use something such as a credit card to brush them off or lightly rub sand over the site. Do not scratch the stung area because the remaining stinging cells will fire and release even more venom. After you remove the tentacles, treat the pain by immersing it in hot water for at least twenty minutes.

Jellyfish stings can spoil an afternoon at the beach, so always keep your eyes open. If you see dead jellyfish on the shoreline beware they will be present in the water also. Although most jellyfish found along our beaches are not dangerous to people, if you are traveling to other countries be cautious as some species of jellyfish are extremely toxic. If the person shows signs of a severe allergic reaction, always seek immediate medical attention.

The jellyfish sting is so painful you will be anxious to find relief but urine is not your answer. It is a medical myth!


 

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2

July 2018

How to Stay Hydrated

By: Arkansas Urology

Whether playing a round of golf or taking the dog for a walk, our internal thermometer will respond by attempting to cool itself. Depending on weather conditions, a long brisk walk may generate up to 16 ounces of sweat (a pound of water).

The human body is made up of over 60% water and that is a reminder of how important it is to avoid dehydration. Water is essential for life and our best choice for refueling.

For the average person, who does light outdoor activities, the recommendation is 8 – 10 glasses a day. Athletes need to take extra precautions by drinking water one hour prior to exercise, every 15 minutes during exercise and an hour after exercise.

You can also stay fully hydrated by eating foods with high water content. Fruits such as watermelon and oranges or vegetables like celery, tomatoes, and cucumbers provide a nutrient-rich water source. Coffee and tea can also count. However, you should limit your intake of alcohol, because it is a diuretic. Diuretics make you urinate more and lose additional fluid.

Drinking sufficient levels on a daily basis is an important part of your bladder and kidney health. Good hydration is thought to help ‘flush out’ bacteria from the urinary tract and avoid infections (UTIs). It also helps to decrease the concentration of substances and crystallization involved in kidney stone formation.

Symptoms of dehydration can be minor, such as increased thirst. You can tell if you are getting enough fluids by checking your urine. It should be light-colored (pale yellow) and you should be urinating every 2-4 hours. Mild dehydration is easy to reverse – simply drink more water. Severe dehydration, on the other hand, requires immediate medical treatment.

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20

June 2018

How To Avoid Kidney Stones This Summer

By: Arkansas Urology

 

The summer is often referred to as kidney stone season and for good reason. We all know when it is hot out, our bodies try to cool off by sweating. It’s hard to keep cool when you aren’t properly hydrated. Dehydration is the most common cause of kidney stones. 

Kidney stones are hard clumps of minerals that sometimes form when your body doesn’t have enough natural chemicals in urine that prevent clumping. These clumps, or stones, can be very painful as they move from your kidneys and through your system. They form when the balance of water, salts, minerals and other substances in urine is off because your urine contains more crystal-forming substances like calcium than the fluid in your urine can dilute.

When you aren’t drinking enough water, the body is unable to eliminate excess minerals through urination. When this happens, those minerals can settle and form stones. The simple solution to avoiding kidney stones? Drink more water!

When we think of kidney stones, we often think of what we are drinking, not so much what we are eating. But what we are putting into our bodies is so important! Watch what you eat this summer. Tangy foods like barbecue for example can make kidney stones more likely because they are high in salt, protein and sugar. Fruits and vegetables are your best bet. The best thing you can do this summer is to be proactive rather than reactive. Make sure you are staying hydrated and eating the best food to fuel your body.

 

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5

June 2018

Men's Health Month

By: Arkansas Urology

 

This month we are talking all things men. With June being Men’s Health month, we wanted to share how important it is for you to seek regular checkups and be an advocate for your health. Keep reading to see how Arkansas Urology can help you in any and every stage of your health journey.

Testicular cancer is more common in men from ages 15 – 35. While testicular cancer is rare, your risk for it does go up if you have a family history of it. We would recommend mentioning any information you have about your family’s medical history to your doctor on your next visit. The good news is that it’s highly treatable even if cancer has spread somewhat. There is not a typical screening, but we do recommend self-checks, so you can see a doctor early if it starts to develop. Look for a lump, feelings of heaviness or an ache or any pain or discomfort in that area.

Prostate cancer affects older men typically and is the No. 1 cancer risk for men. We recommend prostate cancer screenings starting at age 50. This can be done sooner if you are at higher risk. About one in nine men will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in their lifetimes. The average age of men at the time of their diagnosis is 66.

The five most common cancers for men are prostate, lung, colorectal, bladder and melanoma. At Arkansas Urology, we also treat bladder cancer of those five. There is no typical screening only symptoms to look for, such as blood in your urine, burning pain and needing to go more frequently.

To learn more about the widely accepted treatments available at Arkansas Urology, visit our Prostate Cancer Center. If you or a loved one has been diagnosed with prostate cancer or needs to schedule a screening, give us a call today. We can help you through this journey from diagnosis to treatment, call 1-877-321-8452.


 

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20

May 2018

7 Health Tips Just For Women

By: Arkansas Urology

Women and men are so very different. What is a health risk to one, might not be one to another and vice versa. Arkansas Urology takes pride in educating women on the various health issues that affect women. We want to partner with you as you take on the challenge of living healthier lives. That being said, here are seven simple health tips just for women:

 

1.Quit Stressing
Stress can have such a negative effect on your body and mind. Since stress can often manifest itself as a physical illness, you should assess stress factors in your life and take measures to reduce them. Taking time to let go can do wonders for your mental health, too. Go for a run, read a book, or meditate to alleviate your stress. You’ll be surprised how at ease you will feel when you let things go and let the stress go with it.

2. Stop Trying Quick Fixes
We all have fallen for the new craze of quick dieting fixes that just never seem to work. They often seem too good to be true yet we try them anyway and then get stressed because they didn’t live up to our expectations, which is not a healthy cycle (see #1 - quit stressing!). Realistically, all we need is a basic diet of fruits and veggies. It’s 80% what you eat and 20% exercise. Take some time to meal prep before your week gets started and get back to basics.

3. Move
Heart disease is the number one killer among women. Getting enough exercise is crucial to maintaining a healthy lifestyle. It doesn’t have to be a strenuous activity, but just getting up and walking around the block in your neighborhood can help. Try a workout class with your friends to make it fun! Keep moving and stay active. Exercise and eating right are basic foundations of a healthy lifestyle.

4. Maintain a Healthy Sex Life
This counts as exercise! There are several benefits to getting the rush of endorphins and hormones that can be released as you take part. Better sleep, a stronger immune system, and even a younger looking appearance are all benefits. This can also help to reduce your stress as well.

5. Don’t Wait to Talk to Your Doctor . . . About Anything
If you are noticing things with your body that just aren’t right, talk to your doctor. Listen to what your body is telling you! You are the best advocate for your health and you have to take care of it. We have an expert team of doctors ready to answer all of your questions and help you with any women’s or pelvic health issues you may be experiencing. Don’t wait! It’s better to ask and learn sooner, rather than later.

6.Get Enough Sleep
It's been said that women often need more sleep than men. Not getting enough sleep can lead to multiple health problems. Feeling restful can help your day feel more productive as well. Try powering off your cell phone 30 minutes to an hour before you go to bed. The light from your screen makes it difficult to fall asleep, and this will help to turn your brain off. Start by reading a book or meditating on a few breathing exercises to slowly relax before you fall asleep. It makes a huge difference.

7. Put Yourself First
Putting yourself before others can seem selfish at first glance. But, in reality, how well can you serve others if you yourself aren’t taken care of? In order to offer your best to those around you, set aside some time to relax or do something for yourself. Feeling guilty is not allowed!

We hope these tips help you better your health throughout the year. Don’t get overwhelmed trying to meet all of these goals. Pick one and stick to it, then once you feel like you have made it a habit, try to be consistent in another area. The more conscious you are of taking care of your health, the more that will be reflected in your decisions. If you have questions about your health, Arkansas Urology is here to answer them and provide you with education and information to assist you in making the best choices when it comes to your health.

 

 

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7

May 2018

Why Women Need a Urologist and a Gynecologist

By: Arkansas Urology

Urologists and gynecologists are two different specialties of medicine that do have some overlap but in reality are very different. A key difference is that while gynecologists treat only women, a urologist would treat both men and women, and occasionally children. While certain illnesses could require a trip to the urologist, there are actually many reasons a healthy women might schedule an appointment outside of a regular gynecologist visit.

In both men and women, the sex organs and urinary tract are connected or closely located in the same area of the body, which means a gynecologist would treat many similar ailments that a urologist might for women. However, as specialists, urologists are trained in other treatment techniques and fields of study such as surgery, disorders of the liver and kidneys, and may also have greater insight when it comes to issues of infertility in couples due to their greater understanding of both male and female fertility.

For healthy women, urologists can be a fantastic resource for preventing common health problems that arise in women through different stages of life. In fact, many urologists will have specialized experience with life stages such as pregnancy, post childbirth and menopause, and can even help you prevent things like incontinence, pelvic pain and urinary tract infections before they set in.

If you’ve visited a gynecologist before for incontinence, pelvic pain or sexual discomfort, but found that your symptoms returned or your condition became chronic, now is the time to seek out the consultation of a urologist. Their breadth of knowledge of both the human reproductive system and the waste removal system works means that they can help you reach a diagnosis sooner. Their training in targeted treatment techniques means you can get back to life as normal in no time.

To speak with a representative about your questions, or to schedule an appointment with one of our providers, call us at 877-321-8452 or contact us online here. Don’t let your quality of life be diminished by uncomfortable symptoms. At Arkansas Urology, we’re here to help you make the most of your health through every stage of life.

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