Patient-Focused Philosophy

The strength and history of innovation at Arkansas Urology stems from a patient-focused philosophy and a dedication to the most advanced technology.

18

December 2017

10 Tips for a Healthy 2018

By: Arkansas Urology

 

New year means new goals. Here at Arkansas Urology, we want you to be happy and healthy by helping you and your family  make wise, healthy decisions regarding your wellbeing over the course of the next year. Think of focusing on your kidneys and bladder this year to boost your urologic health. Here is our list of our top 10 tips for a healthy 2018.

  1. Stay hydrated! This helps to rid your body of waste, toxins, and ensure your kidneys and bladder are working well.
  2. Exercise your pelvic floor muscles by doing kegel exercises.
  3. Choose to be smoke-free. Smoking has the potential to increase bladder and kidney cancers.
  4. Empty your bladder before bed.
  5. Make sure to bathe thoroughly every day to prevent infections.
  6. Maintain a healthy weight by exercising regularly.
  7. Try to limit your intake of salt since it makes you retain more water and is hard on your kidneys.
  8. Resist the urge to hold it in. Go to the restroom when nature calls.
  9. Avoid eating foods that may irritate your bladder such as acidic foods like tomatoes and oranges.
  10. Of course, make plans to visit your urologist for checkups throughout the year!

We hope these top 10 tips for a healthy 2018 help you reach your goals and enjoy a year full of health!

 

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5

December 2017

Let’s Talk BPH

By: Arkansas Urology

BPH, otherwise known as benign prostatic hyperplasia, is an enlarged prostate gland. When the prostate gland becomes enlarged it can create problems with urinating due to the enlargement narrowing or blocking the urethra, making it difficult to urinate. BPH is very common in men as they get older. The cause of BPH can be blamed on changes in hormone balance and cell growth, as well as genetics.

Symptoms of BPH can include having trouble starting and stopping urinating, a frequent feeling of needing to go, pain when urinating, and not feeling like you have emptied your bladder. The most common symptom is an enlarged prostate. Again, due to the prostate being enlarged with the potential to block your urethra, it could lead to other complications such as urinary tract infections, kidney stones, or blood in your urine. On the other hand, you also may have no signs of symptoms.

In order to properly diagnose BPH, your doctor may conduct several tests ranging from a physical exam to taking a urine sample or performing a rectal exam. Treatment options can be as simple as at home treatments. This could include avoiding caffeine and alcohol, steering clear of medicines that make going to the restroom difficult, and emptying your bladder as best as you can. If at home treatments do not prove to be an effective method of treating your BPH, your doctor may prescribe medication or suggest surgery to relieve your symptoms if they persist. Surgery options could include transurethral incision of the prostate, laser therapy, microwave therapy, or needle ablation.

Be sure to check with your doctor if you are experiencing any of these symptoms or others since prostate cancer and BPH have similar symptoms. While BPH does not cause prostate cancer, since the symptoms are similar it is certainly important to be seen by your doctor.

 

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20

November 2017

Why Does my Bladder Hurt?

By: Arkansas Urology

Millions of Americans suffer from bladder pain without ever knowing what the source of their discomfort is. While there could be multiple causes for your pain, the most common causes are interstitial cystitis, urinary tract infection, kidney stones and bladder cancer. Sometimes, the bladder may not be the source of the pain so several tests or procedures may need to be conducted to rule out different diagnoses. 

 

One of the most common causes as previously stated is interstitial cystitis, which is also referred to as painful bladder syndrome. It is chronic pain that can often be confused with urinary tract infections since you frequently feel the need to urinate repeatedly, ranging from 40-60 times a day. Other symptoms will vary between individuals so it is more difficult to diagnose. 

When you visit your doctor, they may request you submit to several tests such as providing a urine sample, cystoscopy, ultrasound, imaging test, or CT scan. Dependent upon what your results are after performing these tests or various others, your doctor may offer several treatments options ranging from medication to bladder distension, nerve stimulation, acupuncture, or surgery. It is best to discuss your treatment options with your doctor.

Changing and monitoring your diet can also help to relieve pain. Watch for what you eat and if it irritates you, write it down so you know to skip that particular type of food. Monitoring your liquid intake can also prove to be helpful. Steer clear of caffeinated beverages as they often act as a diuretic.

While bladder pain often affects more women than men, it does not mean men are exempt. Because bladder pain can be a result of multiple causes, it is best to not ignore or dismiss your pain and make an appointment to see your doctor.

 

 

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6

November 2017

No Shave November

By: Arkansas Urology

Movember is the movement to grow mustaches to raise awareness of men’s health issues. Movember is not only about cancer but other men’s health issues from suicide prevention to depression to healthy lifestyle. No Shave November is a non-profit organization that is dedicated to increasing cancer awareness. They believe in fundraising for cancer prevention, research and education. Throughout the month of November, men do not shave their beards and women can forego shaving their legs in order to spark conversations about cancer awareness. Since many lose their hair when undergoing cancer treatment, men will grow their hair in order to prevent and educate others about the seriousness of cancer. 

Both movements and organizations have the same goal in mind to raise awareness for men’s health and cancer. They both encourage letting your hair grow a bit longer in November. They both raise money along with raising awareness and donate to organizations that assist their causes. And of course, you can participate in either on whatever scale you would like. You never have to officially sign up or raise money just to help grow awareness with your growing hair.

Both are definitely unique ways to raise cancer and men’s health awareness. Many people do it in honor or memory of someone who is battling or passed away from cancer. For those who have a personal tie to cancer or men’s health issues, Movember and No Shave November can take on a special meaning.

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2

October 2017

How to Reduce Bladder Leakage

By: Arkansas Urology

 

If you suffer from overactive bladder (OAB) and are wondering if there are any ways you can reduce your bladder leakage, you are in luck. Fortunately, there are several ways you can work to reduce accident causing leaks from overactive bladder. Knowing which type of incontinence you suffer from can also be helpful in targeting it. The main two types of incontinence are stress incontinence and urge incontinence.

Make sure that if you wear adult diapers or absorbent products that they fit you correctly and are the right absorbency for your individual needs. Take time to test out various products to find the best option for you since they can each offer various protection levels. Doing so can go a long way in preventing surprise mishaps.

If you have issues with night time incontinence, cut off your liquid intake 2-3 hours before bedtime and make sure to empty your bladder before heading to bed. Additionally, make sure you are steering clear of caffeine and alcohol which both act as a diuretic. By checking your food and liquid intake, you may be able to target what irritates your bladder. As you review your diet, check to see if you are getting all of the vitamins and nutrients you need. For example, vitamin D and magnesium can possibly help to reduce bladder spasms. Be sure to discuss this with your doctor before you decide to take optional supplements.

Did you know losing weight can help as well? Working out can relieve the pressure added weight can place on your bladder and pelvic muscles. Another exercise you can perform that may not lead to losing weight but is helpful, is performing kegel exercises. Try squeezing your pelvic muscles when using the restroom to stop yourself from going. By practicing and strengthening these muscles, you can train your muscles to prevent leaks.

If these tips are not giving you the results you desire, be sure to talk to your doctor about various other options such as surgery and medications. There are multiple solutions available to relieve you of your incontinence.

 

 

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18

September 2017

Medical Myth – Diabetes will cause a UTI

By: Arkansas Urology

While having type 2 diabetes makes you more prone to urinary tract infections (UTIs), the idea that diabetics will have chronic UTIs is a myth. In fact, UTIs are very preventable for most people by taking simple precautions. 

Diabetics are 60 percent more likely to have UTIs than non-diabetics because of a few reasons. First, poor circulation means less mobility for infection-fighting white blood cells. Some diabetics also aren’t able to empty their bladders fully or as frequently as is required to flush out harmful bacteria due to nerve damage. High glucose levels can also affect the sugars in your urine and create a breeding ground for UTI causing bacteria.

When preventing UTIs while controlling diabetes, watching your glucose levels is even more important than usual. Any time glucose levels remain too high, you will be at risk for contracting an infection. The body’s typical reaction to UTIs is to increase glucose levels even further, but occasionally glucose levels will drop unexpectedly in certain people.

Foods to incorporate into your diet for prevention are low-sugar cranberry juices or supplements, fresh blueberries, oranges, unsweetened probiotic yogurt, tomatoes, broccoli, and spinach. Any low-sugar food that is high in antioxidants will help keep your urine inhospitable to bad bacteria. Green tea and plenty of water will also help flush your system.

As long as you are conscious of your diet and glucose levels, drink plenty of water, and make sure to empty your bladder frequently and completely, there is no reason diabetes should mean anyone has to have a UTI. However, if UTIs are still a concern, your urologist should be able to work with you to develop a prevention plan catered to your medical history and dietary needs. Contact our offices today to schedule an appointment at 501-219-8900, or visit our homepage to chat directly with one of our medical agents.

 

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4

September 2017

Truth about Experimental Prostate Cancer Therapies

By: Arkansas Urology

Extensive research into the optimal radiation schedule to treat prostate cancer has been conducted in the last several years, because the optimal schedule for curative treatment is not yet known. It has been questioned whether or not treatment time could be reduced safely, even with an increase in radiation fractions per treatment. The resulting therapy, hypofractionated therapy, has seen mixed results. 

The key benefit to hypofractionated therapy is, for most patients, the accelerated treatment schedule, which can shed weeks off of traditional treatment. While studies have shown this shortened timeline to be statistically insignificant from the traditional timeline’s effectiveness in eradicating prostate cancer cells, scientist’s concerns lie in the side effects of this concentrated treatment.
 
In a clinical study with four trials, hypofractionated therapy was shown to be effective in reducing prostate-specific antigens (PSAs), but had inconsistent results for the recurrence of these antigens and in cancer-free survival rates. Inconsistencies in the studies that followed also lead to an absence of data on the overall survival rate of patients receiving accelerated treatment because many of these studies focused on PSA or biochemical disease-free survival alone, often without taking into account the quality of life of the survivors.
 
Symptoms like rectal bleeding two years after treatment were found in 42 percent of hypo-fractionation treated patients and only found in 27 percent of the conventionally fractionated arm. Patients with compromised urinary function were also found to have significantly worse urinary function after hypofractionated treatment as opposed to traditional dosage plans.
 
With inconsistencies in studies themselves, and in the quality of patient recovery in the years after accelerated treatment, hypofractionated therapy cannot at this time be recommended for all patients with prostate cancer. The study of this new therapy is ongoing, and while it is promising, it just isn’t at a stage where it can be considered a viable alternative to traditional treatment. To learn more about the widely accepted treatments available at Arkansas Urology, visit our Prostate Cancer Center.

 

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21

August 2017

How Urine Color Can Show if You Have an Infection

By: Arkansas Urology

Urine color is a factor that many of us flush away without a second thought, but it can actually be a very important indicator of your urinary health. While normal, healthy urine will vary in shade, changes in color should be noted and in some instances reported to your urologist. 

Healthy urine can vary all the way from almost clear to a golden color, although if your urine is always a strong yellow you are very likely dehydrated and should drink more water. Completely clear urine can also be caused by some medications, but it is not the color to aim for when trying to find your ideal hydration level. A pale yellow is generally considered ideal by most urologists. 

Colors for concern are shades of amber, pink, red, orange, blue, green, brown or black. Ambers and oranges are often signs of severe dehydration, severe enough that sometimes drinking water isn’t enough. Blues, greens and occasionally brighter oranges are most likely caused by medications, but if you aren’t taking any at the moment you should contact your urologist immediately because they can be signs of rare conditions.

The most dangerous urine colors of pink, red, brown and black usually all indicate blood in the urine. This is commonly a sign of severe infection that could reach to the bladder or even the kidneys. Any shade of these should be reported to your urologist so they can begin testing and treat the infection right away.
 
It’s important to note, however, that certain foods like beets, rhubarb and blackberries can cause pink or reddish tinges to urine if consumed in large amounts. Be sure to take this into account when enjoying these foods to avoid a scare later. Any changes to urine lasting longer than a day can still be linked to a medical issue and should be seen by a urologist, no matter what foods you have consumed. 
 
If you’ve noticed a strange color or odor in your urine lately, you should take it seriously and have your urologist take a look. Infections are best treated early to avoid spreading or worsening as infections are prone to do.
 
Our offices are always a phone call away at 1-877-321-8452, or go to our site and chat with someone in our office.

 

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7

August 2017

Top Foods that Can Help A UTI

By: Arkansas Urology

Your diet can affect your body in so many different ways from weight to hair growth to bladder health. So, it’s no surprise that UTIs can be affected by the foods you eat. 
 
UTIs, or urinary tract infections, are actually fairly easy to control and/or avoid with a balanced diet. In fact, your diet is often the first place you should look to improve when trying to increase your overall health. Not only food, but also the beverages you drink have a heavy influence on bladder health and UTI contractions. 
 
According to most research, the pH of urine is a large factor in how hospitable the urinary tract will be to the bacteria that causes a UTI. Because our diet directly affects the ph of our urine, we can manipulate this balance to be beneficial for UTI fighting compounds already present in the body.
 
A healthy pH is often a high one that allows the “bad bacteria blocking” compound siderocalin to do its job effectively. Polyphenols, a type of antioxidant, also help this “blocking” process starting all the way back in the digestive system.
 
Foods and drinks high in antioxidants and with a slight acidic taste can help keep everything in check. These foods include cranberries, blueberries, oranges, dark chocolate, unsweetened probiotic yogurt, tomatoes, broccoli and spinach. Smart drink choices are decaf coffee; cranberry, blueberry, or pomegranate juices; and black and green tea. Of course, plenty of water is also essential when fighting off a UTI.
 
While a healthy diet of antioxidant-rich foods is important and can help relieve a UTI, if your symptoms last longer than a week or two you should contact your urologist right away. UTI’s left untreated can spread into the kidneys or become chronic and much more difficult to treat. To set up an appointment for diet consultation or treatment, call us at 1-800-255-1762 or chat with us online using our new direct chat feature available on our website. 

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18

July 2017

Do Only Women Experience Urine Leakage

By: Arkansas Urology

During pregnancy, many women experience urine leakage or urinary incontinence to some degree. It happens when you lose bladder control and urine leaks before you can get to the bathroom. It’s not uncommon for women to experience this because the expanding uterus puts more pressure on the bladder. However, urine leakage is a common phenomenon for a lot of different types of people, not just women who are pregnant or have had children. While that may be the stereotype, men and women of all ages and in all stages of health can experience urine leakage with various levels of treatability.

women-pregnancy-urologyThe good news is in most cases urine leakage, or urinary incontinence, is highly treatable once the root cause has been determined. The two most common types of urinary incontinence are stress incontinence and urge incontinence.

Stress incontinence is the most common type, affecting over 12.2 million adults in the U.S. alone. Urine leakage occurs when there is too much pressure on the bladder for the bladder muscles to withstand. Weak pelvic floor muscles or a strained or distended bladder can cause this. Many factors can cause stress incontinence like age, childbirth, enlarged bladder and being overweight. In mild cases, simply including pelvic floor muscle exercises like kegels into your routine can retrain your bladder and reduce “accidents.”

Urge incontinence occurs when there is a sudden, intense need to urinate and no way to reach a restroom in time. This can be caused by damaged nerves that don’t signal a need to “go” until it’s too late, or by bladder muscles that contract prematurely. This type of incontinence can be harder to diagnose, but monitoring your water intake and drinking only in small, frequent sips can alleviate symptoms.

No matter your age or life stage, urinary incontinence is nothing to be ashamed of and should be treated by your urologist immediately. With timely treatment, many cases can be significantly eased rather quickly. If you have been living with urinary incontinence, you should know that you have options. You urologist will be able to diagnose your specific case and work with you to create a treatment plan to give you your best quality of life.

Give us a call today at 1-877-321-8452 to talk to one of our team members more about urine leakage or other issues you may be experiencing. 

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