Services

At Arkansas Urology, we provide specialty services you won’t find anywhere else in the state. We offer urologic services in our state-of-the-art facility and comprehensive surgery center. Learn more about our service areas, conditions and treatment.

14

September 2016

2016 Kickoff to Men’s Health Big Screen Event set for Sept. 29

By: Arkansas Urology

 

NORTH LITTLE ROCK (Sept. 14, 2016) – Men are invited to the 12th annual Kickoff to Men’s Health Big Screen Event on Thursday, Sept. 29, from 5-8 p.m. to receive a free, potentially lifesaving, preventative screening. This event is hosted by Arkansas Urology and Epoch Health in observance of National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month and will be held at Arkansas Urology’s North Little Rock campus, located at 4200 Stockton Drive.

Each man will receive a free comprehensive men’s health screening, including a combination PSA-DRE prostate exam. Arkansas Urology and Epoch Health physicians will check for potential heart, blood pressure, kidney, bladder and metabolism problems. Physicians will also assess vitamin, nutrient, LH, FSH and hormone levels (including testosterone, estrogen, thyroid function and prolactin), as well as conduct DNA tests for hypercoagulability, screenings for potential internal bleeding and urinalyses.

Arkansas Urology and Epoch Health will also give away a flat-screen TV every 20 minutes to men who get screened. Men are encouraged to call 501-219- 8900 to schedule an appointment. Screening results may be mailed to participants or specific results from a healthcare provider may be relayed by phone.

“Last year’s event offered more than 400 men information about their health – information they may not have had if not for this free screening event,” said Dr. Tim Langford, president of Arkansas Urology. “We’re proud to host this annual event that raises awareness of the importance of men’s health and provides a safe and supportive environment for men who may be hesitant to come in for a screening.”

Kickoff to Men’s Health Big Screen Event is also sponsored by Baptist Health Medical Center – North Little Rock. More information about this year’s event is available at ArkansasUrology.com or EpochMensHealth.com.

About Arkansas Urology
Arkansas Urology, the largest urology practice in Arkansas, is celebrating its 20th year serving patients across the state. It continues to offer the latest innovations in medical technology and surgical techniques to patients with a variety of urological conditions. The clinic’s physicians and professional staff comprise one of the most experienced and respected urological practices in the region. Approximately 32,500 patients visit Arkansas Urology each year to receive the best in compassionate, quality care. Arkansas Urology also treats patients at satellite clinics in North Little Rock, Benton, Clinton, El Dorado, Heber Springs and Russellville.

 

About Epoch Health
Epoch Health, which pioneered in Arkansas the concept of a physician-supervised testosterone therapy clinic, helps men as young as 29 enjoy an enhanced quality of life through testosterone therapy. The Epoch Health model of care focuses on the patient’s specific healthcare needs by conducting a thorough symptom evaluation that precisely tests T-levels among other health issues during initial and ongoing visits.

 

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25

August 2016

2016 Kickoff to Men’s Health Big Screen Event set for Sept. 13

By: Arkansas Urology

LITTLE ROCK (Aug. 24, 2016) – Men are invited to the 12th annual Kickoff to Men’s Health Big Screen Event on Tuesday, Sept. 13, from 5-8 p.m. to receive a free, potentially lifesaving, preventative screening. Those attending will also have a chance to meet NASCAR driver Mark Martin. This event is hosted by Arkansas Urology and Epoch Health in observance of National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month and will be held at Arkansas Urology’s Little Rock campus, located at 1300 Centerview Drive.

Each man will receive a free comprehensive men’s health screening, including a combination PSA-DRE prostate exam. Arkansas Urology and Epoch Health physicians will check for potential heart, blood pressure, kidney, bladder and metabolism problems. Physicians will also assess vitamin, nutrient, LH, FSH and hormone levels (including testosterone, estrogen, thyroid function and prolactin), as well as conduct DNA tests for hypercoagulability, screenings for potential internal bleeding and urinalyses.

Arkansas Urology and Epoch Health will also give away a flat-screen TV every 20 minutes to men who get screened.

Men are encouraged to call 501-219-8900 to schedule an appointment. Screening results may be mailed to participants or specific results from a healthcare provider may be relayed by phone.

“Last year’s event offered more than 400 men information about their health – information they may not have had if not for this free screening event,” said Dr. Tim Langford, president of Arkansas Urology. “We’re proud to host this annual event that raises awareness of the importance of men’s health and provides a safe and supportive environment for men who may be hesitant to come in for a screening. We’re also very excited that Mark Martin will be at the event this year to sign autographs, meet fans and talk about the importance of men’s health.”

Kickoff to Men’s Health Big Screen Event in Little Rock is also sponsored by CHI St. Vincent. More information about this year’s event is available at ArkansasUrology.com.

About Arkansas Urology

Arkansas Urology, the largest urology practice in Arkansas, is celebrating its 20th year serving patients across the state. It continues to offer the latest innovations in medical technology and surgical techniques to patients with a variety of urological conditions. The clinic’s physicians and professional staff comprise one of the most experienced and respected urological practices in the region. Approximately 32,500 patients visit Arkansas Urology each year to receive the best in compassionate, quality care. Arkansas Urology also treats patients at satellite clinics in North Little Rock, Benton, Clinton, El Dorado, Heber Springs and Russellville.

About Epoch Health

Epoch Health, which pioneered in Arkansas the concept of a physician-supervised testosterone therapy clinic, helps men as young as 29 enjoy an enhanced quality of life through testosterone therapy. The Epoch Health model of care focuses on the patient’s specific healthcare needs by conducting a thorough symptom evaluation that precisely tests T-levels, among other health issues, during initial and ongoing visits.

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21

April 2016

PA-C join Arkansas Urology’s Little Rock clinic

By: Arkansas Urology

LITTLE ROCK (April 11, 2016) – Arin Stephens, PA-C, has joined Arkansas Urology at its Little Rock clinic. As a certified physician assistant, Stephens will work in conjunction with Arkansas Urology’s physicians to coordinate comprehensive, quality healthcare.

“Physician Assistants are an integral part of the care team here at Arkansas Urology,” said E. Scot Davis, CEO of Arkansas Urology. “With her advanced training and education, Arin is licensed to diagnose health issues and prescribe medications. Her skills complement our physicians’ skills and expand our clinic’s capacity to see, treat and heal patients.”

Arin earned her certification and a master’s degree in physician assistant studies from the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth, TX. While at the University of of North Texas, she also completed a Masters of Public Health in Environmental Health. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Biology degree while attending Texas Christian University including a minor degree in Movement Science.

Prior to joining Arkansas Urology, she was a PA-C in family practice at the Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) in Fayetteville, AR.

“PA’s are becoming more and more critical to the delivery of quality medical care across the industry,” said Dr. Tim Langford, president of Arkansas Urology. “Here at Arkansas Urology, we will continue to expand our team with physicians, APNs, physician assistants, RNs and others who demonstrate the level of compassion, skill and expertise our patients expect from our clinics.”

About Arkansas Urology
Arkansas Urology provides the latest innovations in medical technology and surgical techniques to its patients through eight Centers of Excellence in urological specialties. The physicians and professional staff comprise one of the most experienced and respected urological practices in the region. Arkansas Urology treats approximately 60,000 patients a year at seven facilities in Little Rock, North Little Rock, Benton, Clinton, El Dorado, Heber Springs and Russellville. In 2014, Arkansas Urology expanded its services by acquiring Epoch Men’s Health, with clinics in Little Rock, North Little Rock, Conway and Benton. Arkansas Urology is made up of 14 physicians, four physician extenders and 150 clinical and business staff employees.

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22

July 2015

Study Sees No Link Between Testosterone Therapy and Blood Clots

By: Arkansas Urology

Study Sees No Link Between Testosterone Therapy and Blood Clots Finding was based on data from more than 30,000 American men, 40 and older.


MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone therapy doesn't appear to increase the risk of blood clots in veins, a new study contends.

The most common forms of this problem -- called venous thromboembolism (VTE) -- are deep vein thrombosis (a clot in the leg) and pulmonary embolism (a clot in the lungs). VTE is the third most common type of cardiovascular problem, after heart attack and stroke, the researchers said.

There is conflicting information about the link between testosterone therapy and the risk of VTE. As a result, many men with low testosterone and their doctors are reluctant to start testosterone therapy, the study investigators said.

"In 2014, the [U.S.] Federal Drug Administration required manufacturers to add a warning about potential risks of VTE to the label of all approved testosterone products," study author Jacques Baillargeon, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, said in a university news release.

"The warning, however, is based primarily on post-marketing drug surveillance and case reports. To date, there have been no published comparative, large-scale studies examining the association of testosterone therapy and the risk of VTE," he noted.

Baillargeon and his colleagues looked at data from more than 30,000 American men, aged 40 and older. The researchers found that having a prescription for testosterone therapy was not associated with an increased risk of VTE.

The researchers also studied various forms of testosterone therapy, including topical creams, transdermal patches and intramuscular injections. No increased risk of VTE was found with any of these forms, the researchers said.

But due to the study's design, it's not possible to say definitively that there's no VTE risk associated with testosterone therapy.

Baillargeon said he recognized the need for more study. "It's also important to note that further research needs to be conducted to rigorously assess the long-term risks of testosterone therapy," he said.

The study was published July 20 in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about testosterone therapy.

SOURCE: University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, news release, July 20, 2015

http://consumer.healthday.com/circulatory-system-information-7/clots-health-news-731/testosterone-therapy-isn-t-linked-to-higher-risk-of-blood-clots-701460.html



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7

July 2015

Arkansas Urology earns accreditation for best practices

By: Arkansas Urology

LITTLE ROCK (July 2, 2015) – The Arkansas Prostate Cancer Center (APCC) of Arkansas Urology has received a three-year accreditation for radiation oncology from the American College of Radiology (ACR).

APCC features state-of-the-art radiological technology specifically to treat prostate cancer. The center is known for its dedicated specialists who tailor holistic treatment to the needs of the individual. Medical professionals at the center work with the patient to deliver highly-localized treatment via intensity- modulated radiation therapy to the tumor while minimizing the damage to surrounding healthy tissue.

“We pride ourselves in providing each patient with the highest quality care possible,” said E. Scot Davis, CEO of Arkansas Urology. “ACR accreditation means that our systems and processes meet stringent evaluations. This is a reflection of our continued dedication to upholding our practice standards.”

With more than 600 accredited sites and 27 years of experience, ACR is the nation’s oldest and most widely accepted radiation oncology accrediting body. Accreditations are only awarded after an extensive peer-review evaluation conducted by board-certified radiologists and medical physicists who are experts in the field. Areas such as patient care and treatment, adequacy of facility equipment and quality control procedures are assessed during these ACR evaluations. All findings are reported to the practice in a comprehensive report that includes any recommendations for improvement.

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19

May 2015

Not just for wrinkles: Urologists using Botox to treat overactive bladder, urinary incontinence

By: Arkansas Urology

 

(May 19, 2015) More than two years ago, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) expanded the approved use of Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) to treat adults with overactive bladder, and the drug’s use for urinary incontinence was approved by the FDA almost five years ago.

That’s right. Botox isn’t only used to rid the face of wrinkles. Botox can also be injected into the bladder to relax it, providing an increase in its storage capacity and a decrease in urinary incontinence. We have seen the positive effects of the proper use of Botox to improve overactive bladder symptoms and urinary incontinence.


Overactive bladder is a type of bladder-control problem that affects more than 33 million Americans of all ages. It occurs when the bladder contracts more often than necessary, even when the bladder is not full.

Symptoms of an overactive bladder can include an urgent, uncontrollable need to urinate; an involuntary loss of urine; frequent urination (typically eight more times in a 24-hour period); and waking up to urinate at night two or more times.

Though overactive bladder is a common medical condition, many patients may feel ashamed or embarrassed to discuss it. However, it is important to communicate with your doctor about your overactive bladder so it can be properly treated.

Urinary incontinence, or uncontrolled urine loss, is more common than most people think. In fact, more than 17 million Americans have urinary incontinence. But urinary incontinence is not a normal process of aging and can occur in patients of all ages.

Under normal conditions, the bladder stores urine until it is voluntarily released. This involves a complex interaction between the brain, spinal cord and bladder. Anything that interferes with this interaction can make a person incontinent.

Incontinence is not life threatening, but it does have negative social implications. You may lose your self-esteem and experience depression, anxiety and feelings of helplessness. Your fear of urine loss may become an obsession. You may lose your sense of sexuality. You may distance yourself from friends and loved ones or limit social interaction outside the home.

The good news is that incontinence can typically be corrected or improved to the point that it no longer interferes with daily activities.

Clinical studies show that Botox relieves symptoms. Randomized, controlled trials show complete continence in patients treated with Botox in as many as 55 percent of cases. The medicine is an effective treatment for overactive bladder and results in a significant improvement in the quality of life of patients.

***

Authors:
Dr. Edwin Diaz
is certifi
ed by the American Board of Urology and is a member of the American Urological Association, American Association of Clinical Urologists, Endourological Society, Arkansas Medical Society, Arkansas Urologic Society and Pulaski County Medical Society. He practices medicine at Arkansas Urology in North Little Rock.

A Little Rock native and Arkansas Baptist graduate, Dr. Taylor Moore completed his residency at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, is a member of the American Urologic Association and the American Medical Association, and recently presented an abstract for the American Urologic Associations South Central Section. He practices medicine at Arkansas Urology clinics in Little Rock and Heber Springs.

 


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5

May 2015

From Urology Times: Injected TRT earns high marks for safety, effectiveness

By: Arkansas Urology

 

A newly published review suggests that age-related testosterone deficiency treatment with intramuscular injections of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) offers health benefits and lower cardiovascular risk compared to testosterone replacement by patch or gel.

READ: Studies examine risk factors for low, high T

While TRT can result in increased muscle mass and strength, decreased fat mass, and increased bone mineral density, the therapy has known risks. These include the development of polycythemia, decreases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, breast tenderness and enlargement, and prostate issues.

The authors point out, however, that TRT does not increase prostate cancer risk. And whether TRT hurts, helps, or has no effect on cardiovascular risk remains controversial in the literature.

The University of Florida, Gainesville, researchers who conducted this latest review were among the authors of a previously published study suggesting that oral TRT increases cardiovascular risk, but no significant cardiovascular effects were noted with injected or transdermal TRT (BMC Med 2014; 12:211).

For the current study, which was published online in the American Journal of Physiology – Endocrinology and Metabolism (April 21, 2015), study authors Stephen E. Borst, PhD, and Joshua F. Yarrow, PhD, reviewed literature indicating “that intramuscular injected TRT produces greater musculoskeletal benefits and lower cardiovascular risk compared to transdermal TRT… We also review the literature discussing the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors as a promising means of improving the safety profile of TRT.”

ALSO SEE: Testosterone nasal gel shows safety, efficacy

According to the authors, for older hypogonadal men, administering TRT by injection, versus orally or transdermally, offers greater musculoskeletal benefits because doses are higher by injection. But while doses are higher when injected, intramuscular TRT might be less likely to result in cardiovascular risks than transdermal TRT. This could be because transdermal testosterone results in greater serum dihydrotestosterone (DHT) elevation, due to significant expression of 5α-reductase in skin—not muscle.

Published April 29, 2015 by Urology Times

 


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27

February 2015

Welcome, Lindsey Galloway!

By: Arkansas Urology

 

APN joins OUR Center of excellence for women’s & Pelvic Health



LITTLE ROCK (Feb. 27, 2015) –
Lindsey Galloway, R.N., APN, of Little Rock has joined Arkansas Urology at its Little Rock clinic.

A registered nurse and a certified nurse practitioner, Galloway will work in conjunction with Arkansas Urology’s physicians to coordinate comprehensive, quality healthcare in the clinic’s Center of Excellence for Women’s & Pelvic Health.

“APNs are an integral part of the care team here at Arkansas Urology,” said E. Scot Davis, CEO of Arkansas Urology. “With her advanced training and education, Lindsey is licensed to diagnose health issues and prescribe medications. Her skills complement our physicians’ skills and expand our clinic’s capacity to see, treat and heal patients.”

Galloway earned her APN certification and a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock. She earned her bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Central Arkansas at Conway. Galloway is also certified by the American Heart Association in Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) and Neonatal Resuscitation (NRP), and is a registered Basic Life Support (BLS) instructor.

Prior to joining Arkansas Urology, she was a nurse in the pediatric intensive care and neonatal intensive care units at Arkansas Children’s Hospital.

“APNs are becoming more and more critical to the delivery of quality medical care across the industry,” said Dr. Tim Langford, president of Arkansas Urology. “Here at Arkansas Urology, we will continue to expand our team with physicians, APNs, physician assistants, RNs and others who demonstrate the level of compassion, skill and expertise our patients expect from our clinics.”

 


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27

February 2015

Free 100% Men's Health Screening

By: Arkansas Urology

CALL 1-844-GoEPOCH For a FREE SCREENING!




Do you want to be more focused at work and at home? Feel more energized and enthused? Epoch can help!

Epoch Men’s Health clinics are offering free, fully comprehensive Men’s Health Screenings. Call 1-844-GoEPOCH (1-844-463-7624) today to set up your free screening and experience men’s healthcare the Epoch way – that’s the right way of getting your body healthy. 


The free 100% Men’s Health Screening is an integral part of Epoch’s mission to keep men healthy. Screening takes about two minutes and is as simple as the prick of a needle. Consumption of food and/or beverages does not impact screening results. The screening includes:

  • PSA
  • Total Testosterone
  • Free Testosterone
  • TSH
  • CBC
  • CMP

Our lab also analyzes men’s bodies for other potential problems:

  • Heart
  • Blood Pressure
  • LH
  • FSH
  • Metabolism (including diabetes)
  • Vitamin and Nutrient Levels (including iron, B-12 and D)
  • Hormones (including testosterone, estrogen, thyroid function and prolactin)
  • Potential Internal Bleeding
  • And much more.


We’ll use these screening and lab results to determine if you have any testosterone deficiencies. We’ll also discuss how you’re feeling and what symptoms – such as low energy, exhaustion, weight gain, sadness, forgetfulness, and hair loss – you might be experiencing. Your test results and symptoms could indicate
Low T or they may show that you’re suffering from a different condition altogether. Either way, our goal is to get to the root of your problem, create a treatment plan tailored to you, get you feeling great and help you experience the best possible quality of life.

Owned and operated by the physicians at Arkansas Urology, Epoch Men’s Health is a healthcare experience unlike any other in Arkansas. Our clinic environment is relaxed and professional, with men squarely in mind, intended to energize and inspire. And we’re conveniently located throughout central Arkansas – in Little Rock on South Bowman Road, in North Little Rock on East McCain Boulevard, in Conway on Exchange Avenue, and in Benton on Medical Park Drive.

Epoch Men’s Health isn’t another shot-box, Low T store; it’s real medicine. Check out EpochMensHealth.com to get the facts. And the call 1-844-GoEPOCH toll-free to set up your free, no obligation 100% Men’s Health Screening. Experience real men’s healthcare, the Epoch way.

Together, we are Epoch Health. Men’s Healthcare. Evolved.







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10

December 2014

Arkansas Urology only clinic in state offering UroLift tech

By: Arkansas Urology

FDA clears new procedure to relieve life-interrupting enlarged prostate symptoms

Arkansas Urology only clinic in state offering UroLift technology

More than 500 million men in the world have a condition called benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) that causes the prostate to enlarge. Nearly half of the men in the U.S. with BPH have symptoms so severe that it disrupts their lives and requires treatment.

The federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently cleared a new minimally invasive procedure called UroLift® to help those suffering from the uncomfortable symptoms of BPH. UroLift has minimal downtime, typically doesn’t require a catheter or overnight stay, and preserves sexual function.

Arkansas Urology is the only urology clinic in the state currently offering UroLift to its patients, and its physicians are performing the procedure at St. Vincent and Baptist Health.

“Most patients will find that they have rapid relief from their BPH symptoms following UroLift,” said Dr. Edwin Diaz of Arkansas Urology. “In fact, most patients can see a difference in as little as two weeks post-procedure.”

UroLift is an implant that lifts or holds the enlarged prostate tissue out of the way so it no longer blocks the urethra, according to the manufacturer’s website. “There is no cutting, heating or removal of prostate tissue,” the website states. “As a first line treatment for BPH, the UroLift system offers a new option for patients looking for an alternative to drugs or major surgery.”

BPH is a benign (non-cancerous) enlargement of the prostate that occurs as men age; reasons for BPH are not fully understood by the urological community. The enlarged prostate presses on and blocks the urethra, causing bothersome urinary symptoms such as a weak or slow urine stream, sense that the bladder cannot completely empty, difficulty or delay in starting urination, urgent feeling of needing to urinate, and a urine stream that stops and starts.

About Arkansas Urology

Arkansas Urology offers the latest innovations in medical technology and surgical techniques to Arkansans with a variety of urological conditions. Arkansas Urology provides services at seven facilities located in Little Rock, North Little Rock, Benton, Clinton, El Dorado, Heber Springs and Russellville, as well as at the Advanced Prostate Cancer Center in Little Rock. Arkansas Urology consists of 15 physicians, three physician extenders, and 150 clinical and business staff employees. For more information, call 501-219-8900 or visit our ArkansasUrology.com.

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