Patient-Focused Philosophy

The strength and history of innovation at Arkansas Urology stems from a patient-focused philosophy and a dedication to the most advanced technology.

18

December 2017

New da Vinci XI offers more benefits to traditional surgery

By: Arkansas Urology

Article previously published in the Log Cabin Democrat.

Baptist Health Medical Center-Conway recently acquired cutting-edge technology that is reshaping the way doctors perform surgery and drastically reducing recovery time for patients. Using four arms that connect into ports with the surgeon sitting at his own machine — like a video game essentially — the da Vanci XI Surgical System provides doctors with 3D visualization, great magnification in the body to perform precise and delicate maneuvers and ability to see small structural issues. It is vital for patients to have the best outcome possible while decreasing the risk of possible surgery complications, hospital stay and recovery time. The hospital purchased the robot for $2.5 million, the surgery bed for better movement at around $100,000 and other pieces of equipment in September, making the Conway location the first in the state to have the complete system. The da Vinci Xi is used multiple times a week by Urologist Dr. Jeff Marotte and Dr. Joseph Ivy in gynecologic oncology, among others. One of the reasons the robot is so revolutionary is because of the decreased amount of time it takes to perform the surgery in the first place. By 1 p.m. Dec. 7, Ivy had already completed seven surgeries that day. “[That’s] kind of a testament to how efficient the crew is and the technology — how it’s advanced and how it’s able to do very difficult surgeries that used to take twice, three times as long and recovery was five, six, seven times as long and allows us to do everything in concise, more precise manners,” he said.

That aspect, Ivy said, directly correlates to how technology has evolved in the medical field through the years. Doctors once only performed open surgery which came with more risks, longer recovery time for patients and morbid scarring. Ivy has been practicing for more 10 years, and about halfway through his fellowship, the robotic systems became more prominent. “It took a little while for even our community to believe it because we always think we’re a bunch of open surgeons,” he said. “We used to be. We always thought open surgery was the only way to do it.” Ivy said it took multiple studies to prove to the surgeons that doing a procedure laparoscopically or robotically — minimally invasive surgeries — produced just as good outcomes but also incredibly altered recovery periods. Ivy said, the robot has found it’s place — it’s sweet spot—used in surgeries in small areas requiring precise maneuvers. “The optics are 1,000s times better,” he said. “You can visualize in multiple difference wavelengths and so I can see vessels, I can see [the] ureter, I can see lymph nodes that you can’t see laparoscopically, so you’re way more precise with your staging.” Ivy said his favorite part about the da Vinci XI is the overall outcomes from survival rate to short-term recovery with less pain and suffering, to shorter hospital stays and lower risk of infection and bleeding. “Everything that you could ever think about surgery is minimized with the robot so being able to take a complex situation like a malignancy and minimize all risks is absolutely the reason the robot should be in existence,” he said. What he’s found, Ivy said, is that most people aren’t taking advantage of the technology simply because they aren’t aware of it’s existence, let alone how it performs. “It’s really sad that somebody has such technology that could really, really improve their outcome to such an advantage and nobody knows about it,” he said.

“It’s kind of bizarre that it’s like that.” Especially the “latest, greatest, absolute most technologically advanced one” Baptist currently possesses. Dr. Marotte, who has been in urology for 12 years, said he hardly does open surgeries anymore and when it comes down to it, performs close to 95 percent of procedures with the hospital’s robot. “There are things I can see in the body that maybe [are] so minute and so delicate that I can appreciate the anatomy and just really do a really beautiful surgery whereas before there was too much blood loss and I couldn’t see clearly,” he said. Marotte said using the robot allows him to do more physically than he could with his own hands — essentially like laparoscopic surgery on steroids — while sitting comfortably at a machine, not over a patient on foot, which could actually extend his career. “It’s a lot of fun,” he said. “Obviously, I’m highly focused during surgery and that’s all I’m thinking about during surgery but what’s the most [rewarding] is seeing the patient after surgery, one month later, their life is changed, hopefully they’re cured or much improved from where they were before and they’re back to work and back to their daily life.” Terri Pendergraft, the director of Perioperative Services and Cath Lab/ IVR, said that is essentially the point of why they do what they do — the good of the patient. The surgery, which doesn’t cost more for the patient and is covered by insurance, was worth every penny, she said. “Our whole goal is to give a patient back their life, their mobility, to do the things they want to do,” Pendergraft said. “We want to give them the best outcome possible and the da Vinci [XI] allows us to do that very technical surgery. That’s something that we strive to give and that’s what gives us the edge.” According to a news release, the da Vinci Surgical System first became available in 2000 and since that time, more than 3,000,000 procedures have been completed worldwide. Currently, the system is used for general, urology, gynecology and cardiothoracic surgeries.

READ MORE

21

August 2017

Vituro Health Expands Into Arkansas, Providing The Latest In Precision Prostate Cancer Care

By: Arkansas Urology

BIRMINGHAM, Ala., Aug. 17, 2017 /PRNewswire/ -- Vituro Health and Arkansas Urology, LUGPA member and the largest urology practice in the state, partnered to offer patients in Arkansas and surrounding states the latest, most innovative technologies in prostate cancer treatment and precision disease management. In conjunction with Vituro Health, Arkansas Urology will offer patients advanced diagnostics, navigation services, and HIFU (High Intensity Focused Ultrasound) therapy. "Arkansas Urology provides the highest quality care and innovation to their patients, we are fortunate to have this quality group representing the Vituro Health brand. Dr. Tim Goodson, his partners and skilled staff are great additions to our growing men's health delivery system," said Clete Walker, CEO of Vituro Health.

The Vituro Health PPMP (Precision Prostate Management Program) offers members personalized plans to determine the best course of action and treatment for their specific situations and needs. The program ensures that men receive the proper treatment they need by only the most skilled and highly trained physicians. Patient support includes scheduling, all travel related services, pursuing insurance reimbursements and serving as an educated resource.

With all the advancements in prostate cancer diagnosis and treatment, patients need to remain vigilant to properly navigate their treatment options. For qualified patients who are looking for a better quality of life treatment, HIFU can prevent the traditional side effects of erectile dysfunction and incontinence.

Dr. Tim Goodson of Arkansas Urology has experience in numerous minimally invasive methodologies, and is excited to add HIFU as another tool he can use to treat patients with fewer side effects. "I've been following the focal therapy movement for a long time with great interest," said Goodson. "Giving patients a minimally invasive treatment option is what we are all about at Arkansas Urology, and this partnership with Vituro is the perfect opportunity to continue doing that on a high level."

Dr. Goodson believes partnering with Vituro Health is the right decision for many reasons. "We were very impressed with Vituro as a whole and the experience that they bring. The attention to detail given to their patients is another thing that sets them apart from other HIFU providers."

Dr. Goodson views focal therapy and HIFU as the next step forward in the prostate cancer industry. "For folks who might be uncomfortable with active surveillance, and don't want the side effects that more invasive treatments like surgery can bring, HIFU is a great option."

By partnering with Arkansas Urology, Vituro Health now offers prostate cancer management services and HIFU treatment to men in 11 different locations across the country.

To schedule a consultation with Dr. Goodson, call 866-4-VITURO, or visit www.viturohealth.com

About Vituro HealthVituro Health empowers men with comprehensive prostate care during all stages of their lives. We arm partner physicians with HIFU (high intensity focused ultrasound) technology and other patient-centric, concierge services to elevate the standard of care and patient experiences. Vituro Health serves patients nationwide and is headquartered in Birmingham, Ala., with partnering physicians in Birmingham, Sarasota, Jacksonville, Atlanta, Washington DC, Baltimore, Philadelphia, Dallas, Tucson, Las Vegas and Little Rock who are carefully selected based on their depth of experience, expertise and dedication to achieving the highest levels of patient outcomes. For more information, visit www.viturohealth.com.

MEDIA CONTACT: Emily Ferrell
eferrell@viturohealth.com
205.862.0016

SOURCE Vituro Health

Related Links

http://www.viturohealth.com

READ MORE

14

December 2016

News Release Registered Nurse joins Arkansas Urology

By: Arkansas Urology

LITTLE ROCK (Nov. 22, 2016) – Stephanie Hawkins of Bryant has joined Arkansas Urology as a nurse team leader working with Dr. Mooney. In this role, she will work closely with Dr. Mooney and manage the staff for one of the clinical pods.

Stephanie earned her Bachelor of Science in nursing and a Bachelor of Science in Biology at Arkansas State University in Jonesboro.“The Nurse Team Leader position guides much of the patient’s experience in our clinics,” said E. Scot Davis, CEO of Arkansas Urology. “We are fortunate to have Stephanie serve in this role for our patients.”

Prior to joining Arkansas Urology, she has served in various nursing positions with organizations such as St. Vincent Infirmary in Little Rock and St. Bernard’s Hospital in Jonesboro.

“To have someone as skilled as Stephanie is vital,” said Dr. Tim Langford, president of Arkansas Urology. “Her experience with patients, staff, and operations will benefit our patients and our staff.”

About Arkansas Urology
Arkansas Urology provides the latest innovations in medical technology and surgical techniques to its patients through eight Centers of Excellence in urological specialties. The physicians and professional staff comprise one of the most experienced and respected urological practices in the region. Arkansas Urology treats approximately 60,000 patients a year at eight facilities in Little Rock, North Little Rock, Benton, Clinton, El Dorado, Heber Springs and Russellville. In 2014, Arkansas Urology expanded its services by acquiring Epoch Men’s Health, with clinics in Little Rock, North Little Rock, Conway, Benton and Springfield, Mo. Arkansas Urology is made up of 14 physicians, three physician extenders, and 150 clinical and business staff employees.

READ MORE

14

September 2016

2016 Kickoff to Men’s Health Big Screen Event set for Sept. 29

By: Arkansas Urology

 

NORTH LITTLE ROCK (Sept. 14, 2016) – Men are invited to the 12th annual Kickoff to Men’s Health Big Screen Event on Thursday, Sept. 29, from 5-8 p.m. to receive a free, potentially lifesaving, preventative screening. This event is hosted by Arkansas Urology and Epoch Health in observance of National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month and will be held at Arkansas Urology’s North Little Rock campus, located at 4200 Stockton Drive.

Each man will receive a free comprehensive men’s health screening, including a combination PSA-DRE prostate exam. Arkansas Urology and Epoch Health physicians will check for potential heart, blood pressure, kidney, bladder and metabolism problems. Physicians will also assess vitamin, nutrient, LH, FSH and hormone levels (including testosterone, estrogen, thyroid function and prolactin), as well as conduct DNA tests for hypercoagulability, screenings for potential internal bleeding and urinalyses.

Arkansas Urology and Epoch Health will also give away a flat-screen TV every 20 minutes to men who get screened. Men are encouraged to call 501-219- 8900 to schedule an appointment. Screening results may be mailed to participants or specific results from a healthcare provider may be relayed by phone.

“Last year’s event offered more than 400 men information about their health – information they may not have had if not for this free screening event,” said Dr. Tim Langford, president of Arkansas Urology. “We’re proud to host this annual event that raises awareness of the importance of men’s health and provides a safe and supportive environment for men who may be hesitant to come in for a screening.”

Kickoff to Men’s Health Big Screen Event is also sponsored by Baptist Health Medical Center – North Little Rock. More information about this year’s event is available at ArkansasUrology.com or EpochMensHealth.com.

About Arkansas Urology
Arkansas Urology, the largest urology practice in Arkansas, is celebrating its 20th year serving patients across the state. It continues to offer the latest innovations in medical technology and surgical techniques to patients with a variety of urological conditions. The clinic’s physicians and professional staff comprise one of the most experienced and respected urological practices in the region. Approximately 32,500 patients visit Arkansas Urology each year to receive the best in compassionate, quality care. Arkansas Urology also treats patients at satellite clinics in North Little Rock, Benton, Clinton, El Dorado, Heber Springs and Russellville.

 

About Epoch Health
Epoch Health, which pioneered in Arkansas the concept of a physician-supervised testosterone therapy clinic, helps men as young as 29 enjoy an enhanced quality of life through testosterone therapy. The Epoch Health model of care focuses on the patient’s specific healthcare needs by conducting a thorough symptom evaluation that precisely tests T-levels among other health issues during initial and ongoing visits.

 

READ MORE

21

April 2016

PA-C join Arkansas Urology’s Little Rock clinic

By: Arkansas Urology

LITTLE ROCK (April 11, 2016) – Arin Stephens, PA-C, has joined Arkansas Urology at its Little Rock clinic. As a certified physician assistant, Stephens will work in conjunction with Arkansas Urology’s physicians to coordinate comprehensive, quality healthcare.

“Physician Assistants are an integral part of the care team here at Arkansas Urology,” said E. Scot Davis, CEO of Arkansas Urology. “With her advanced training and education, Arin is licensed to diagnose health issues and prescribe medications. Her skills complement our physicians’ skills and expand our clinic’s capacity to see, treat and heal patients.”

Arin earned her certification and a master’s degree in physician assistant studies from the University of North Texas Health Science Center in Fort Worth, TX. While at the University of of North Texas, she also completed a Masters of Public Health in Environmental Health. She earned her Bachelor of Science in Biology degree while attending Texas Christian University including a minor degree in Movement Science.

Prior to joining Arkansas Urology, she was a PA-C in family practice at the Medical Associates of Northwest Arkansas (MANA) in Fayetteville, AR.

“PA’s are becoming more and more critical to the delivery of quality medical care across the industry,” said Dr. Tim Langford, president of Arkansas Urology. “Here at Arkansas Urology, we will continue to expand our team with physicians, APNs, physician assistants, RNs and others who demonstrate the level of compassion, skill and expertise our patients expect from our clinics.”

About Arkansas Urology
Arkansas Urology provides the latest innovations in medical technology and surgical techniques to its patients through eight Centers of Excellence in urological specialties. The physicians and professional staff comprise one of the most experienced and respected urological practices in the region. Arkansas Urology treats approximately 60,000 patients a year at seven facilities in Little Rock, North Little Rock, Benton, Clinton, El Dorado, Heber Springs and Russellville. In 2014, Arkansas Urology expanded its services by acquiring Epoch Men’s Health, with clinics in Little Rock, North Little Rock, Conway and Benton. Arkansas Urology is made up of 14 physicians, four physician extenders and 150 clinical and business staff employees.

READ MORE

22

July 2015

Study Sees No Link Between Testosterone Therapy and Blood Clots

By: Arkansas Urology

Study Sees No Link Between Testosterone Therapy and Blood Clots Finding was based on data from more than 30,000 American men, 40 and older.


MONDAY, July 20, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- Testosterone therapy doesn't appear to increase the risk of blood clots in veins, a new study contends.

The most common forms of this problem -- called venous thromboembolism (VTE) -- are deep vein thrombosis (a clot in the leg) and pulmonary embolism (a clot in the lungs). VTE is the third most common type of cardiovascular problem, after heart attack and stroke, the researchers said.

There is conflicting information about the link between testosterone therapy and the risk of VTE. As a result, many men with low testosterone and their doctors are reluctant to start testosterone therapy, the study investigators said.

"In 2014, the [U.S.] Federal Drug Administration required manufacturers to add a warning about potential risks of VTE to the label of all approved testosterone products," study author Jacques Baillargeon, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, said in a university news release.

"The warning, however, is based primarily on post-marketing drug surveillance and case reports. To date, there have been no published comparative, large-scale studies examining the association of testosterone therapy and the risk of VTE," he noted.

Baillargeon and his colleagues looked at data from more than 30,000 American men, aged 40 and older. The researchers found that having a prescription for testosterone therapy was not associated with an increased risk of VTE.

The researchers also studied various forms of testosterone therapy, including topical creams, transdermal patches and intramuscular injections. No increased risk of VTE was found with any of these forms, the researchers said.

But due to the study's design, it's not possible to say definitively that there's no VTE risk associated with testosterone therapy.

Baillargeon said he recognized the need for more study. "It's also important to note that further research needs to be conducted to rigorously assess the long-term risks of testosterone therapy," he said.

The study was published July 20 in the journal Mayo Clinic Proceedings.

More information

The U.S. National Library of Medicine has more about testosterone therapy.

SOURCE: University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, news release, July 20, 2015

http://consumer.healthday.com/circulatory-system-information-7/clots-health-news-731/testosterone-therapy-isn-t-linked-to-higher-risk-of-blood-clots-701460.html



READ MORE

7

July 2015

Arkansas Urology earns accreditation for best practices

By: Arkansas Urology

LITTLE ROCK (July 2, 2015) – The Arkansas Prostate Cancer Center (APCC) of Arkansas Urology has received a three-year accreditation for radiation oncology from the American College of Radiology (ACR).

APCC features state-of-the-art radiological technology specifically to treat prostate cancer. The center is known for its dedicated specialists who tailor holistic treatment to the needs of the individual. Medical professionals at the center work with the patient to deliver highly-localized treatment via intensity- modulated radiation therapy to the tumor while minimizing the damage to surrounding healthy tissue.

“We pride ourselves in providing each patient with the highest quality care possible,” said E. Scot Davis, CEO of Arkansas Urology. “ACR accreditation means that our systems and processes meet stringent evaluations. This is a reflection of our continued dedication to upholding our practice standards.”

With more than 600 accredited sites and 27 years of experience, ACR is the nation’s oldest and most widely accepted radiation oncology accrediting body. Accreditations are only awarded after an extensive peer-review evaluation conducted by board-certified radiologists and medical physicists who are experts in the field. Areas such as patient care and treatment, adequacy of facility equipment and quality control procedures are assessed during these ACR evaluations. All findings are reported to the practice in a comprehensive report that includes any recommendations for improvement.

READ MORE

19

May 2015

Not just for wrinkles: Urologists using Botox to treat overactive bladder, urinary incontinence

By: Arkansas Urology

 

(May 19, 2015) More than two years ago, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) expanded the approved use of Botox (onabotulinumtoxinA) to treat adults with overactive bladder, and the drug’s use for urinary incontinence was approved by the FDA almost five years ago.

That’s right. Botox isn’t only used to rid the face of wrinkles. Botox can also be injected into the bladder to relax it, providing an increase in its storage capacity and a decrease in urinary incontinence. We have seen the positive effects of the proper use of Botox to improve overactive bladder symptoms and urinary incontinence.


Overactive bladder is a type of bladder-control problem that affects more than 33 million Americans of all ages. It occurs when the bladder contracts more often than necessary, even when the bladder is not full.

Symptoms of an overactive bladder can include an urgent, uncontrollable need to urinate; an involuntary loss of urine; frequent urination (typically eight more times in a 24-hour period); and waking up to urinate at night two or more times.

Though overactive bladder is a common medical condition, many patients may feel ashamed or embarrassed to discuss it. However, it is important to communicate with your doctor about your overactive bladder so it can be properly treated.

Urinary incontinence, or uncontrolled urine loss, is more common than most people think. In fact, more than 17 million Americans have urinary incontinence. But urinary incontinence is not a normal process of aging and can occur in patients of all ages.

Under normal conditions, the bladder stores urine until it is voluntarily released. This involves a complex interaction between the brain, spinal cord and bladder. Anything that interferes with this interaction can make a person incontinent.

Incontinence is not life threatening, but it does have negative social implications. You may lose your self-esteem and experience depression, anxiety and feelings of helplessness. Your fear of urine loss may become an obsession. You may lose your sense of sexuality. You may distance yourself from friends and loved ones or limit social interaction outside the home.

The good news is that incontinence can typically be corrected or improved to the point that it no longer interferes with daily activities.

Clinical studies show that Botox relieves symptoms. Randomized, controlled trials show complete continence in patients treated with Botox in as many as 55 percent of cases. The medicine is an effective treatment for overactive bladder and results in a significant improvement in the quality of life of patients.

***

Authors:
Dr. Edwin Diaz
is certifi
ed by the American Board of Urology and is a member of the American Urological Association, American Association of Clinical Urologists, Endourological Society, Arkansas Medical Society, Arkansas Urologic Society and Pulaski County Medical Society. He practices medicine at Arkansas Urology in North Little Rock.

A Little Rock native and Arkansas Baptist graduate, Dr. Taylor Moore completed his residency at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, is a member of the American Urologic Association and the American Medical Association, and recently presented an abstract for the American Urologic Associations South Central Section. He practices medicine at Arkansas Urology clinics in Little Rock and Heber Springs.

 


READ MORE

5

May 2015

From Urology Times: Injected TRT earns high marks for safety, effectiveness

By: Arkansas Urology

 

A newly published review suggests that age-related testosterone deficiency treatment with intramuscular injections of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) offers health benefits and lower cardiovascular risk compared to testosterone replacement by patch or gel.

READ: Studies examine risk factors for low, high T

While TRT can result in increased muscle mass and strength, decreased fat mass, and increased bone mineral density, the therapy has known risks. These include the development of polycythemia, decreases in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, breast tenderness and enlargement, and prostate issues.

The authors point out, however, that TRT does not increase prostate cancer risk. And whether TRT hurts, helps, or has no effect on cardiovascular risk remains controversial in the literature.

The University of Florida, Gainesville, researchers who conducted this latest review were among the authors of a previously published study suggesting that oral TRT increases cardiovascular risk, but no significant cardiovascular effects were noted with injected or transdermal TRT (BMC Med 2014; 12:211).

For the current study, which was published online in the American Journal of Physiology – Endocrinology and Metabolism (April 21, 2015), study authors Stephen E. Borst, PhD, and Joshua F. Yarrow, PhD, reviewed literature indicating “that intramuscular injected TRT produces greater musculoskeletal benefits and lower cardiovascular risk compared to transdermal TRT… We also review the literature discussing the use of 5α-reductase inhibitors as a promising means of improving the safety profile of TRT.”

ALSO SEE: Testosterone nasal gel shows safety, efficacy

According to the authors, for older hypogonadal men, administering TRT by injection, versus orally or transdermally, offers greater musculoskeletal benefits because doses are higher by injection. But while doses are higher when injected, intramuscular TRT might be less likely to result in cardiovascular risks than transdermal TRT. This could be because transdermal testosterone results in greater serum dihydrotestosterone (DHT) elevation, due to significant expression of 5α-reductase in skin—not muscle.

Published April 29, 2015 by Urology Times

 


READ MORE

27

February 2015

Welcome, Lindsey Galloway!

By: Arkansas Urology

 

APN joins OUR Center of excellence for women’s & Pelvic Health



LITTLE ROCK (Feb. 27, 2015) –
Lindsey Galloway, R.N., APN, of Little Rock has joined Arkansas Urology at its Little Rock clinic.

A registered nurse and a certified nurse practitioner, Galloway will work in conjunction with Arkansas Urology’s physicians to coordinate comprehensive, quality healthcare in the clinic’s Center of Excellence for Women’s & Pelvic Health.

“APNs are an integral part of the care team here at Arkansas Urology,” said E. Scot Davis, CEO of Arkansas Urology. “With her advanced training and education, Lindsey is licensed to diagnose health issues and prescribe medications. Her skills complement our physicians’ skills and expand our clinic’s capacity to see, treat and heal patients.”

Galloway earned her APN certification and a master’s degree in nursing from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock. She earned her bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Central Arkansas at Conway. Galloway is also certified by the American Heart Association in Advanced Cardiovascular Life Support (ACLS), Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) and Neonatal Resuscitation (NRP), and is a registered Basic Life Support (BLS) instructor.

Prior to joining Arkansas Urology, she was a nurse in the pediatric intensive care and neonatal intensive care units at Arkansas Children’s Hospital.

“APNs are becoming more and more critical to the delivery of quality medical care across the industry,” said Dr. Tim Langford, president of Arkansas Urology. “Here at Arkansas Urology, we will continue to expand our team with physicians, APNs, physician assistants, RNs and others who demonstrate the level of compassion, skill and expertise our patients expect from our clinics.”

 


READ MORE