Patient-Focused Philosophy

The strength and history of innovation at Arkansas Urology stems from a patient-focused philosophy and a dedication to the most advanced technology.

27

April 2021

How Common is Erectile Dysfunction?

By: Arkansas Urology

 

Erectile dysfunction is fairly common. In fact, 1 in 10 men will experience ED at some point in his life. Your risk of developing ED increases with age, but it’s possible for men of all ages to experience the condition. It isn’t unusual to fail to achieve an erection occasionally, but if you’re having trouble more than 50 percent of the time, that isn’t normal and you probably require treatment. It’s important to remember that you aren’t alone, and there’s nothing to be embarrassed or ashamed about.
 
Common causes of erectile dysfunction include:

● Diabetes
● Obesity
● Heart disease
● Low testosterone
● Certain medications
● High cholesterol
● Neurological problems
● Alcohol and tobacco use
● Sleep disorders
● Depression

If you’re having problems getting or maintaining an erection long enough for sexual intercourse, you
should talk to your doctor as soon as possible. He or she will ask you some questions and probably
perform a few tests to figure out what the underlying causes are. You can then discuss your treatment
options and decide on the best one for you.

How ED is treated depends on the cause of the problem, and options include counseling, lifestyle
changes, oral prescription medications, injections, and in rare cases, surgery. The good news is that
almost 70 percent of men report improvements after they begin using prescription drugs. If the above
treatments don’t work for you, other options include external penile splints and vacuum devices. Your
doctor will be able to provide more information and answer any questions you may have.

Erectile dysfunction is a common condition, and you don’t have to silently suffer from it. Take back
your quality of life today by speaking to your urologist and getting some answers.

At Arkansas Urology, we’re here for you. Our patients’ health has been and will always be
our top priority! Are you suffering from erectile dysfunction? Contact us today to schedule your
appointment, or book your appointment online.

 

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29

March 2021

What's the Difference Between OAB & Incontinence?

By: Arkansas Urology

 

While overactive bladder and urinary incontinence have some similarities, the conditions are not the same. They can both negatively affect your overall quality of life though, so it’s important to get help if you experience symptoms of either condition.
 
Overactive bladder is the sudden, urgent need to urinate throughout the day. Rather than gradually experiencing more and more urgency as your bladder fills up over time, you’ll abruptly feel the need to go to the restroom. This can happen within seconds at home, at work or in public, which can be very frustrating. People suffering from overactive bladder also urinate more frequently than the average person, sometimes more than eight times per day. Many people believe that OAB is a normal part of aging, but that’s a myth. The condition is never normal, no matter your age.
 
Urinary incontinence is the inability to control your bladder, causing you to leak urine. This can
happen after sneezing, laughing, or coughing, or it may happen while exercising or lifting
something heavy. Stress Urinary Incontinence (SUI) is more common in women than men.
Urinary incontinence may develop during or after pregnancy, and Kegel exercises can
strengthen your pelvic floor muscles and help reduce symptoms. OAB, stress and urge
incontinence can also have a profound impact on quality of life, and impair social and career
life goals.

Many people with overactive bladder also suffer from urgency incontinence and experience
leaking from time to time. It is definitely possible to develop both conditions, and it’s
important to understand that you have nothing to be ashamed of. Both OAB and urinary
incontinence are common conditions, and you do have treatment options. Your doctor will be
able to help you develop a treatment plan that’s best for your unique situation so you can
improve your quality of life.

At Arkansas Urology, we’re here for you. Our patients’ health has been and will
always be our top priority! Are you suffering from overactive bladder or urinary incontinence?
We can help! Contact us today to schedule your appointment, or book your appointment
online.

 

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19

March 2021

Can What I Eat and Drink Affect Prostate Cancer?

By: Arkansas Urology

 

What you eat and drink can have an effect on prostate cancer, so it’s important to be informed and make healthy decisions regarding what you put in your body. Research shows that red meat and processed meat aren’t good choices for men with prostate cancer. You should also eat dairy products, such as cheese, in moderation and avoid foods that are high in fat. Avoid high-calcium diets as well, as they have been shown to potentially encourage prostate cancer growth.
 
Some better options to include in your diet:

● Fruits and vegetables are known for reducing inflammation and providing several vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Broccoli, brussels sprouts, carrots , spinach,
tomatoes, beans, legumes, berries, oranges and pomegranates are all healthy options
that you should include in your meals as often as possible.

● Green tea contains antioxidants that can help slow prostate cancer growth and keep
it from spreading.

● Whole grains like whole wheat bread, brown rice, quinoa and oatmeal contain plenty
of fiber, which can help lower cholesterol levels and improve gut health.

● Fish is rich in omega-3 fatty acids, which have a variety of health benefits. Cod,
salmon, trout and flounder are all great choices with plenty of flavor.

As far as what you drink goes, alcohol and sugary drinks should only be consumed in
moderation. It’s best to avoid alcoholic beverages and sugary, carbonated sodas. Be sure to
stay hydrated with plenty of water at all times, and mix in lemon juice for an added boost.

Eating a healthy, well-balanced diet can make a world of difference when it comes to your
overall health. If you have prostate cancer, it’s especially important to make healthy choices
when it comes to what you eat and drink. Form new habits today and your body will thank
you!

At Arkansas Urology, we’re here for you. Our patients’ health has been and will
always be our top priority! Do you need to schedule your next prostate exam? Contact us
today to schedule your appointment, or book your appointment online! 

 

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17

February 2021

Can I Stop Taking OAB Medication if Symptoms Have Stopped?

By: Arkansas Urology


When it comes to overactive bladder, there is no cure for the condition. With that said, there are several treatment options available to help you manage your symptoms. It’s great that you haven’t experienced any discomfort for a few months, but that means your medication is doing exactly what it is intended to do. It’s important to continue to take it as directed, otherwise symptoms may flare up again, including:

-The frequent urge to urinate
-Urinating often at night or bedwetting
-Leaking urine

Medication is typically prescribed alongside behavior modification techniques, or if behavior modification isn't working for you. These medications prevent involuntary contractions of the bladder muscle, which helps relieve symptoms. Popular drugs include Ditropan XL®, Detrol®, Vesicare® and Toviaz®.

If you don’t want to depend on taking medication, there are other treatment options available. Lifestyle changes can make a big difference, and we suggest limiting the amount of alcohol, salt and caffeine that you consume. Kegel exercises are also beneficial, as they strengthen your pelvic floor muscles.

Sacral nerve stimulation is also a wonderful option for many people. A neurostimulator device is carefully inserted under the skin, and it sends electrical pulses to the sacral nerve. Since this directly affects bladder control muscles, this stimulation can help improve your symptoms. It also lasts for several years, so you don’t have to worry about keeping up with medication each day.

If your symptoms go away after you begin taking medication, it’s important to continue to take it to ensure that they don’t return. You should always talk to your doctor before stopping a medication, and let him or her know if you’re interested in other treatment options.

At Arkansas Urology, we’re here for you. Our patients’ health has been and will always be our top priority! Would you like to learn more about overactive bladder treatment options? Contact us today to schedule your appointment, or book your appointment online.

 

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11

February 2021

What Should I Expect if I Get a Vasectomy?

By: Arkansas Urology

Before you decide to get a vasectomy, make sure that you are finished having children. Getting a vasectomy reversed doesn’t guarantee that you’ll be able to get your partner pregnant in the future. The chances of success also drop the longer you wait between your procedure and reversal. However, if you’re certain that your family is complete, a vasectomy is a reliable form of contraception with a very low risk of complications.

If you’re feeling nervous, don’t fret! You’ll be given local anesthesia, so you’ll only feel some tugging instead of pain. The whole procedure takes less than 30 minutes to complete, and only requires one or two small incisions. Your doctor will remove part of your vas deferens, and the tubes will be cauterized or tied. You can go home soon after the surgery, and shouldn’t need to miss much work to recover, unless you want an excuse to stay home and watch basketball or any other big sports events going on.

After the procedure, you may experience mild discomfort, swelling and bruising that lasts for a few days. Use an ice pack to relieve the swelling and take over-the-counter pain medication for pain relief. Be sure not to exercise, lift anything heavy or have sex while your incision is healing. You shouldn’t experience any intense pain, but it’s important to let your doctor know right away if you do, as it could be a sign of an infection. Be sure to continue using birth control until your doctor has confirmed that it’s ok to stop.

At Arkansas Urology, we’re here for you. Our patients’ health has been and will always be our top priority! Are you ready to schedule your vasectomy? Contact us today to schedule your appointment, or book your appointment online.

 

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29

January 2021

What is the Prevalence of Prostate Cancer?

By: Arkansas Urology

According to the Centers of Disease Control and Prevention, 13 out of 100 American men will develop prostate cancer at some point in life, and about 2-3 will die from the disease. It’s the second leading cause of cancer death in men across the country. Prostate cancer is very common, and more likely to develop in older men, African American men and those who have a family history of it. Bringing it a little closer to home, The American Cancer society estimates nearly 2,500 Arkansans will be diagnosed with prostate cancer in 2021. They also estimate 270 Arkansans will die from Prostate Cancer in 2021.

 

The good news is that it’s highly treatable, especially when diagnosed early. That’s why routine exams are incredibly important, particularly after the age of 50. If you are at a higher risk of developing prostate cancer, you may want to consider getting exams even earlier.

There are usually no symptoms in the very early stages of prostate cancer, but pay attention if you experience any of the following:

●Painful urination or ejaculation

●Blood in your urine or semen

●Difficulty urinating

●Urinating frequently, including at night

●Pain in your lower back, hips, abdomen or pelvis

If you’re diagnosed with the disease, take time to talk to your doctor about the best treatment option for your unique situation. An active surveillance approach is preferred for many patients who have slow-growing cancer. Patients who have a higher risk type of cancer or desire curative therapy can often choose between surgical therapy, radiation therapy, or alternative therapies alongside their treatment of choice.

While prevalent, keep in mind that the five-year survival rate for men with local or regional prostate cancer is nearly 100%. Most men do not die from the disease, especially if it’s detected early and hasn’t spread to other parts of the body. The best way to stay on the safe side is to get screened regularly, even if you aren’t experiencing any symptoms.

Arkansas Urology provides World Class Cancer Care at 14 locations across the state of Arkansas. Book an appointment with us in your hometown, today.

 

 

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7

January 2021

How is OAB Diagnosed?

By: Arkansas Urology

Overactive bladder can certainly affect your quality of life, but it’s nothing to be ashamed of and you aren’t alone. If you find yourself urinating more often than usual or having leaking accidents, don’t hesitate to contact your doctor right away. To get a proper diagnosis, your doctor will begin with a complete health history to learn when your symptoms started and whether or not you have other urinary conditions.

You should keep a diary and record how much you drink, how often you urinate, and how urgently you feel the need to urinate each day. This will help you accurately answer any questions your doctor may have. Your doctor will examine your pelvis, abdomen, genitals and rectum, and likely perform a few tests to diagnose overactive bladder. These include:

  • Urinalysis or urine sample
  • Urodynamic testing
  • Cystoscopy to detect cysts and growths in the bladder

These tests will help your doctor determine what is causing your overactive bladder, which will help him or her decide on the best treatment for your unique situation. When it comes to treatment, options range from behavior and lifestyle modifications to medication and sacral nerve stimulation with Interstim or Axonics.

If you’re suffering from overactive bladder, don’t spend another day embarrassed or uncomfortable. Millions of people suffer from the condition, and you shouldn’t feel ashamed to ask for help. Rushing to the restroom, wetting accidents and adult diapers can be a thing of the past. Experience relief from your symptoms...our team is here for you every step of the way.

At Arkansas Urology, we’re here for you. Our patients’ health has been and will always be our top priority! Would you like to learn more about overactive bladder treatment options? Contact us today to schedule your appointment, or book your appointment online.

 

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17

December 2020

Can Wine Prevent Kidney Stones?

By: Arkansas Urology

While there isn’t specific scientific proof that wine prevents kidney stones from forming, certain studies have shown that both red and white wines can have a positive effect on kidney health. When it comes to alcohol, wine in particular seems to reduce the risk of kidney stones more than a variety of other alcoholic beverages.

Since alcohol is a diuretic, it causes our kidneys to produce more urine and remove excess fluids. This may contribute to the prevention of stones, but you should make sure you’re drinking plenty of water while enjoying your wine. Also, an unrelated benefit of drinking red wine is that it may lower your risk of heart disease due to antioxidants like resveratrol.

Although excessive alcohol consumption can cause kidney stones, drinking wine in moderation just might play a role in preventing them from forming. While wine may break down and provide your body with useful antioxidants, you shouldn’t overdo it. It’s important to remember that moderation is key when it comes to drinking any type of alcoholic beverage.

If you want to take it a step further when it comes to prevention, be sure to drink a lot of water. Staying properly hydrated is one of the single most important things you can do to prevent kidney stones. You should also avoid salty foods, sodas, and foods high in oxalate like beets, berries, peanuts, and chocolate. While you’re at it, cut down the amount of animal protein you consume in order to prevent the formation of uric acid stones.

We know all too well how painful kidney stones can be, and we don’t want them to ruin your holiday fun! If you have any questions about kidney stones, don’t hesitate to reach out to your urologist.

Do you suffer from kidney stones? At Arkansas Urology, our team of physicians is dedicated to helping you get healthy, stay healthy and live the life you want. Schedule an appointment online or give us a call today at 1-800-255-1762.

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18

November 2020

What is Peyronie's Disease?

By: Arkansas Urology

Peyronie’s disease is a condition in which fibrous scar tissue forms under the skin of the penis, causing painful, curved erections. Common symptoms of Peyronie’s disease include soft erections, feeling lumps in the penis, pain during sexual intercourse, shortening of the penis and having trouble maintaining an erection. While some men are still able to have sex and don’t experience pain, other men have difficulties with the disease.

A risk factor associated with Peyronie’s disease is genetics, but genetics alone doesn’t cause it. It’s often caused by some sort of minor or repeated injury to the penis. Age and cardiovascular health may also play a role in the development of the condition. It can certainly have an effect on your sex life if it goes untreated, and that understandably leads to anxiety and stress. The good news is you can get help and find relief.

If you’re suffering from this condition, don’t be embarrassed to reach out to your doctor. He or she will be able to help you decide on the best treatment for your unique situation. Most of the time this can be diagnosed by a simple physical examination.

Some common treatment options include medication, injections, lifestyle changes and surgery. Quitting smoking, exercising regularly and reducing the amount of alcohol you drink may help prevent erectile dysfunction related to the disease. Certain medications may also be beneficial. However, if symptoms don’t improve after a certain period of time, surgery may be necessary. Your doctor will help you decide on the best route to take. The important thing is to seek help soon for the condition and don’t be afraid to talk to your doctor about what you’ve been experiencing.

Peyronie’s disease can be painful and put a strain on your relationships, but don’t lose hope or put treatment on the back burner. At Arkansas Urology, our team of physicians is dedicated to helping you get healthy, stay healthy and live the life you want. Schedule an appointment online or give us a call today at 1-800-255-1762.

 

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5

November 2020

Overactive Bladder

By: Arkansas Urology

 

Overactive bladder, or OAB, is the frequent and urgent need to empty your bladder. It affects over 30 million people in the US alone and half of the people with overactive bladder are struggling with urgency urinary incontinence (UUI) when leakage occurs. This condition can also be known as “spastic bladder” or “irritable bladder.” We understand how frustrating it can be to constantly have to find a bathroom and for your sleep to constantly be disrupted. Overactive bladder can be a nuisance at best, and life-altering at worst.

Getting up to urinate often at night, the sudden urge to urinate, leaking urine, wetting accidents and frequent urination are all symptoms of overactive bladder. While overactive bladder is most common in older adults, the condition is not a normal result of aging. It’s not something that people should ever assume they have to live with. While one in 11 people in the US suffers from overactive bladder, it mainly affects people 65 and older. However, women can be affected earlier, often in their early to mid 40s. This occurs about twice as frequently in women as it does men. About one in five adults over 40 will have some varying degrees of OAB symptoms. 
 
Many people believe that leaking, wetting accidents and problems urinating are normal things that just start happening as we get older, but that’s just a myth. Overactive bladder is never normal. The good news is overactive bladder can be treated, and you can go back to feeling like yourself again. 
 
However, the first step is definitely talking to your doctor. This is a common problem, so don’t be ashamed or afraid to have an open conversation with your doctor about what you have been experiencing. As many as 30% of men and 40% of women live with OAB because they think they don’t have any options, but that’s simply not the case.

At AU, we take a comprehensive approach to treating overactive bladder. We funnel patients through our nationally-recognized pathways to get the right treatment for them. The key we have found in treating OAB is to start with first-line therapies like behavioral adjustments and then work to more advanced therapies that can include minimally invasive procedures.

You can contact AU to learn more about how we treat OAB and to visit with a doctor about your condition.

 

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